Polish Music Journal
Vol. 5, No. 2, Winter 2002. ISSN 1521 - 6039




Annotated Catalogue of Music by Zygmunt Stojowski

by Joseph A. Herter




Introduction


The entries in the catalogue follow the following format: (1) works with opus numbers, (2) works without opus numbers published during the composer's lifetime, (3) unpublished works that have not been found and that (4) are known to have existed. Each entry is provided with opus, title, dedication, movements, orchestration, information about manuscripts and editions, additional remarks including performance history and citations from reviews, recordings. Numerous piano pieces appeared in multiple editions; versions issued by Stanley Lucas, Weber, Pitt and Hatzfeld Ltd., of London and Leipzig and Schott & Co. of London and Mainz usually contained a copyright line with a date and the name of the copyright owner: H. B. Stevens & Co. Some publishers used multiple names of their companies on the cover pages, for instance Schott's editions usually have the following names: "London, Schott & Co.; Bruxelles, Schott Frères; Mayence: B. Schott's Söhne; Paris: Editions Schott." At times "Mayence" is replaced by "Mainz."

The orchestration is presented in the following fashion. The instruments are divided by groups and are indicated in the following order: solo instrument; woodwinds (flute, oboe, clarinet and bassoon), brass (horn, trumpet, trombone, tuba), timpani and percussion, voices, harp and strings. When one performer plays more than one instrument, the alternating instrument is listed in parentheses. When an asterisk follows a number, an additional family instrument is required. For example, the number 3* for the oboe means that two oboes and an English horn are required.

There are the following special symbols and abbreviations:

* - Asterisk prior to a number, opus, or movement indicates that an analysis exists in Maria Macharska-Wolanska's Twórczosc fortepianowa Zygmunta Stojowskiego, an unpublished master's thesis at the Jagiellonian University, Cracow: 1950. AAN - Archiwum Akt Nowych (State Archives in Warsaw)
Anon. Per. - Anonymous Performer
ASU - Arizona State University (Tempe)
BBC - BBC Music Library (London)
BJ - Biblioteka Jagiellonska (Cracow)
BNP - Bibliothèque Nationale (Paris)
BNW - Biblioteka Narodowa (Warsaw)
CAM - Chopin Academy of Music (Warsaw)
CBN - Centralny Biblioteka Nutowa (Warsaw)
CC - Connecticut College (New London)
CLP - Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh
CPL - Cleveland Public Library
CSU - California State University (Hayward)
DPL - Detroit Public Library
EAST - Eastman School of Music (Rochester, NY)
FLP - Free Library of Philadelphia (Fleischer Collection)
GAM - Gdañsk Academy of Music (Poland)
G & W - Gebethner & Wolff (Warsaw)
Hatzfeld - Stanley Lucas, Weber, Pitt, and Hatzfeld Ltd. (London & Leipzig)
HVU - Harvard University (Cambridge, Massachusetts)
ICA - Interlochen Center for the Performing Arts (Interlochen, Michigan)
IPA - International Piano Archives (New York)
LOC - Library of Congress (Washington, D.C.)
LS - Luisa Stojowski
MC - Mills College (Oakland, California)
MCM - Mannes College of Music (New York)
MO - Musica Obscura (Johnson City, Tennessee)
MSM - Manhattan School of Music (New York)
NU - Northwestern University (Evanston, Illinois)
NYPLPA - New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
OSU - Ohio State University (Columbus)
PC - Paris Conservatoire
PIASA - Polish Institute of Arts and Sciences of America (NYC)
PR - Polish Radio (Warsaw)
PWM - Polskie Wydawnictwo Muzyczne (Cracow)
SAM - Szymanowski Academy of Music (Katowice)
Schott - London, Schott & Co.; Bruxelles, Schott Frères; Mayence (or Mainz): B. Schott's Söhne; Paris: Editions Schott
SMU - Southern Methodist University (Dallas)
TU - Tulane University (New Orleans)
UM - University of Michigan (Ann Arbor)
UMC - University of Maryland (College Park)
UMK - University of Missouri (Kansas City)
USC - University of Southern California, Polish Music Center (Los Angeles)
WSU - Wichita State University (Kansas)
UP - University of Pennsylvania (Philadelphia)
UTA - University of Texas (Austin)
WU - Warsaw University
ZS - Zygmunt Stojowski
ZLSC - Zygmunt and Luisa Stojowski Collection (Family Archives)



Works with Opus Numbers




Opus 1: Deux pensées musicales pour piano (1889) - Henriette Moszkowska (née Chaminade)

Movements:

  • No.1 Mélodie
  • No.2 Prélude

Editions:

  • V. Durdilly, Paris, 1889: BNP
  • Costallat & Cie., Paris, 1891: WU
  • Theodore Presser, Philadelphia, 1891: ZLSC
  • Schott, London: 1901: BNW, NYPLPA; EAST No. 1; WU No. 2; USC (copy, No. 1, 2)
  • No. 1 also appeared in the December 1905 issue of The Etude.


Remarks:

    There are two arrangements of Mélodie for violin and piano. One was by "The German Paganini" August Wilhemj (1845-1908), which was published by Schott's Söhne, Mainz and London in 1907: WU. An earlier arrangement (1905) for violin and piano was made by Ch. Lifka, B. Schott's Söhne, Mayence: ZLSC, LOC. Finally, Mischa Elman (1891-1967) edited the Wilhemj arrangement and included it in the Mischa Elman Concert Folio, published by C. Fischer in New York in 1920: MC, LOC. Jascha Heifetz was known to play one of these arrangements, e.g., Carnegie Hall recital on January 11, 1920. Arranged for organ by Goss-Custard and published by Schott & Co. in 1891: ZLSC. Also arranged for chamber orchestra by Alfred Andrée and published by Schott & Co. in Mainz in 1909.


Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded by ZS for Ampico (piano roll) Recordings 67863H.
  • No. 1 recorded on radio by ZS, October 15, 1944, NY: Desmar IPA 115, 1976.
  • No. 1 recorded by Boris Goldovsky, Allegro Royale 1402, c. 1955
  • No. 2 recorded by LS, Desmar IPA 115, 1976.


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Opus 2: Deux caprices-études pour piano (1889) - "A mon cher Maître Louis Diémer"

Movements:

  • *No.1 Fileuse
  • *No.2 Toccatina

Sources and Editions:

  • Uznneau, Paris: 1889: BNP
  • Augener & Co, London, 1892: LOC
  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig, 1892: WU, BJ No. 2; USC (no. 1 and 2; copy)
  • Theodore Presser, Philadelphia: (date?)
  • No. 1 was reissued in 1903 and 1910 by G & W (BNW, BJ) and in 1988 by MO.


Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded by Zygmunt Lisicki for PR, RII 88716-A, 1957.


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Opus 3: Piano Concerto in F-sharp Minor (1890) - "Hommage à Antoine Rubinstein"

Movements:

  • Andante poco mosso
  • Romanza - Andante sostenuto
  • Allegro con fuoco

Orchestration:

  • Pno-2.2 (2nd alt. E.H.).2.2.-4.2.3.0-timp.perc-str

Sources and Editions:

  • Manuscript: Northwestern University, Moldenhauer Archives, acquired in 1972 along with two printed copies. First draft in ZLSC.
  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig & Leipzig: 1893
  • Full score: LOC
  • Full score & parts: BBC, CBN, FLP
  • Arr. for two pianos by the composer: LOC, NYPLPA, WU, ZLSC


Remarks:

    First performance took place in Paris on February 17, 1891, at the Salle Erard with the Orchestre Colonne under the direction of Benjamin Godard. Further early performances included Stojowski playing with the Berlin Philharmonic on February 19, 1892 at the Singakademie, and British performances with Sir Charles Hallé's Orchestra in Manchester. First American performance took place with the New York Metropolitan Opera Orchestra on April 2, 1911 with Josef Pasternack conducting and the composer performing.
    "Beautifully laid out for the piano. Somewhat dated but contains some beautiful melodies. Virtuosic in places." (Hinson)
    "The piano part is very virtuosic, making use of all the sound possibilities of the instrument. Thus, we have double note figurations, triplets in the inner voices, high tremolos which are several times reinforced by the octave, wide octaves and chords, and frequently displayed passages of chords and arpeggios." (Macharska)


Recordings:

  • Józef Stompel for PR, PB 974, The Polish Radio & TV Orchestra in Cracow, Salwarowski - conductor, 1979
  • Piotr Loboz for PR, DR 184, The Polish Radio & TV Orchestra in Cracow, Missona - conductor, date ?
  • Jonathan Plowright and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Martin Brabbins conducting, for Hyperion Records CDA67314 in 2002


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Opus 4: Trois intermèdes pour piano (1891)

Movements:

  • *No. 1 in G Major - Paul Braud
  • *No. 2 in E Minor - Pierre-René Hirsch
  • *No. 3 in B-flat Major - Lennart Lundberg

Sources and Editions:

  • Theodore Presser, Philadelphia: 1891
  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig, 1891: Listed in Hofmeister
  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig, 1894: WU, BNW No. 2 and 3, BJ has an autographed copy dedicated to Stojowski's composition teacher in Cracow, W³adys³aw ¯eleñski:
    Kochanemu Tatusiowi muzycznemu
    'czem chata bogata, tem rada'
    —Zygmunt
  • Schott, Mainz, ca. 1900: Listed in Hofmeister


Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded by Anon. Per. for Aeolian Co. (piano roll) AEOL T 30316, London, ca. 1905 and for The Orchestrelle Coy. (piano roll) AEOL L 2387, London, 1905-08.
  • No. 3 recorded by Józef Smidowicz for PR, 88716-C, 1957


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Opus 5: Quatre morceaux (1894)

Movements:

  • No.1 Berceuse - Sir Charles Hallé
  • No.2 Scherzo - Clotilde Kleeberg
  • *No.3 Gondoliera - Augusta Bennich
  • No.4 Mazurka - Hilda Thergerström

Sources and Editions:

  • Schott & Co., London, 1894: BNP, WU, BJ No. 1, BNW and BJ nos. 3 and 4, USC No. 1 and 4
  • Theodore Presser, Philadelphia: (date ?)
  • No. 3 also appeared in the August 1905 issue of The Etude, three months before his arrival in the USA.


Remarks:

    See review of Opus 5 under Opus 10, Deux Orientales:


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Opus 6: Variations et Fugue pour deux violons, alto et violoncelle (1891) - Ladislas Górski

Sources and Editions:

  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig, 1891: BJ, BNP, EAST, LOC, USC (copy)


Remarks:

    Performed in Berlin on February 19, 1892


Recordings:

    Recorded for PR, DR 186, Quartet from Polish Radio & TV Orchestra in Cracow, 1957


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Opus 7: Le printemps (1895), Cantata for mixed chorus and orchestra - "A la Mémoire de son bien aimé Maître Léo Delibes"

Orchestration:

  • 2*.2.2.2.-4.2.3.1.-timp-perc-chorus SATB-hp-str
  • Text: From Fourth Ode of Horace, Book I, Salvitur acris hiems... French translation by Jukes Barbier, German by Alfred Nossie, English by Mrs. Malcolm Lawson, and Polish by J. Czubek.

Sources and Editions:

  • Choral score (French and German): Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig, 1895: ZLSC
  • Choral score (German and Polish): Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig, 1895: Listed in Hofmeister
  • Piano-vocal score: Novello & Co., London, 1905 (English ed.): EAST, LOC, WU (Polish text by L. Marjañska is handwritten in the score.)
  • Full score (in French & German): Hatzfeld, 1895: BBC, BNP, LOC, PR
  • Full score manuscript: ZLSC (missing p. 15)
  • Full score (French & English) and parts, edited by John M. Hein: USC (planned online edition)


Remarks:

    The French text by Jules Barbier ("L'aimable printemps ramène dans la plaine ...") is the same as in Debussy's cantata of the same title for 4-part chorus and orchestra. It was his Prix de Rome submission piece in 1884, and its catalog number is L56.
    By command of Queen Victoria, the cantata was premiered in English at a State Concert that was held at Buckingham Palace on the evening of Friday, July 5, 1895. The orchestra and chorus, conducted by Sir Walter Parratt, consisted of 160 performers and comprised Her Majesty's Private Band, assisted by members selected from the principal orchestral and choral societies of London.

    Le printemps was performed in Warsaw at an all-Stojowski program given by the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra in January 1902. It was sung in Polish by the Warsaw choir Lutnia, an amateur choral ensemble which is still in existence. The highly esteemed composer Zygmunt Noskowski (1846-1909) wrote a review of the concert for Kurjer Warszawski, calling it one of the most excellent events of the Philharmonic's first season. His commentary on the cantata follows:

    Spring, the Ode by Horace in a translation by J. Czubek, is very charming in its thinking of musical images. The composer, with the help of the orchestra, strives in detail to represent the scenes written in each verse. The very beginning has an idyllic character and is full of serenity. This is why this same idea is repeated at the end, rounding out the entire work well. Although there are several closing modulations that are entertaining, they nevertheless strengthen the mood of serenity.

    The lengthy review closes by giving a description of how the young, thirty-two-year-old composer and pianist was idolized by Warsaw's concertgoers. He was bombarded with flowers: three wreathes (one from the Philharmonic and two from fans), a basket of white roses presented by a group of young ladies as well as flowers thrown from the audience onto the stage. Taken from a Kurjer Warszawski press clipping in the Paderewski Archives, 570 No. 41, AAN.
    The first performance in the USA was with the Boston Singing Club at the Boston Opera on March 21, 1906.


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Opus 8: Trois morceaux pour piano (1891)

Movements:

  • *No.1 Légende - Joseph Schloss
  • *No.2 Mazurka - Constantin Hartong
  • *No.3 Serenade - Frederique Hertzka

Sources and Editions:

  • Pitt & Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig, 1892: BJ, EAST, BNW nos. 1 and 3, WU nos. 1 and 2
  • Theodore Presser, Philadelphia: nos. 2 & 3, (date?)
  • Gebethner & Wolff, Warsaw: No. 3 (c. 1910?), fingering by A. Michalowski, WU
  • Schott & Co., London & Mainz, n.d. (Copyright H.B. Stevens & Co. 1891): USC


Remarks:

  • No. 3 also appeared in the November 1907 issue of The Etude. It was also arranged for violin and piano by A. Kaiser, Leipzig: Schott, 1910, and appeared under the title of Aubade; ZLSC, SAM. It 1955, it was also arranged for clarinet and string orchestra by Arnold Rezler (b. 1909), PR. Rezler's career as a conductor included the following: Director and conductor of Polish Radio in Bydgoszcz (1945-56), Warsaw Philharmonic (1956-58), Teatr Wielki (1958-65), and Polish Army Orchestra (1965-75). He also arranged Stojowski's Fantasie pour trombone for orchestra.


Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded by Aleksander Brachocki for Ampico (piano roll) Recordings 6643


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Opus 9: Suite in E-flat Major for orchestra (1891) - "Hommage à Hans von Bülow"

Movements:

  • Thème varié
  • Intermède polonais
  • Rêverie et Cracovienne

Orchestration:

  • 3 (3rd alt. Picc).3*.2.2.-4.4.3.1-timp.perc-hp-str

Sources and Editions:

  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig: 1893
  • Full score: EAST, LOC, NYPLPA, PR
  • Full score and parts: FLP

Remarks:

    First performance took place on February 19, 1892 in Berlin. Von Bülow conducted the piece on one of his last concerts in Hamburg. Tchaikovsky was also to conduct the Suite during the spring of 1894 at a concert in St. Petersburg. Unfortunately, the Russian composer's death in November 1893 prevented that from happening. In Vienna, Stojowski showed the work to Brahms, who cried out, Donnerwetter! Sie instrumentieren aber raffiniert! [By Jove! You do orchestrate with finesse!] "Recollections of Brahms" by Zygmunt Stojowski, Musical Quarterly (1933): 143-150. The first London performance took place at Queen's Hall with the London Symphony Orchestra on June 14, 1914, Emil M³ynarski conducting, and the first American performance took place at Carnegie Hall with the New York Philharmonic Society on February 5, 1915, Josef Stransky conducting.
    The theme of the first movement is based on the Polish Marian hymn Witaj, Królowo [Salve Regina] and is introduced by the clarinet and bassoon in octaves.
    "The variations are decidedly clever. The second movement is entitled Intermede polonais, and is, in fact, an animated Mazurka. There is a certain waywardness about the music that gives to it the appearance of an improvisation; the middle section meno mosso, which opens with a refined but melancholy solo for the cor anglais, is highly characteristic. The third movement is...full of strange rhythms and striking harmonies... The instrumentation is of an elaborate character, and the music, generally, polyphonic." London: The Musical Times (August 1, 1894): 547


Recordings:

  • Recorded by Brico Symphony Orchestra, Antonia Brico conductor, Carnegie Hall, Carnegie Hall Recording Co., 16-inch 78-RPM: January 25, 1939; ZLSC
  • Recorded by "members of" the New York Philharmonic Orchestra, George Fitelberg conductor, Carnegie Hall, U.S. Department of State, International Broadcasting Division, 16-inch 78 RPM: May 4, 1944, ZLSC
  • Recorded for PR, 81620-621, The Grand Symphonic Orchestra of Polish Radio in Katowice (WOSPR), Jerzy Ko³aczkowski - conductor, 1969; second recording PA 1417 A


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Opus 10: Deux orientales for piano (1894)

Movements:

  • No.1 Romance - "A mon ami Paul Bergon"
  • *No.2 Caprice - "A mon ami Joseph C. Hofmann"

Sources and Editions:

  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig, 1894: WU, USC (No. 1)
  • G & W, Warsaw: c. 1900
  • Musica Obscura, Johnson City, 198-: SMU, UMK
  • Polish Music Center, USC, 2004: online printable PDF edition
  • Manuscript score: USC


Remarks:

    A review of Opus 10 as well as Quatre morceaux for piano, Op. 5 appeared in the June 1, 1895 issue of The Musical Review, p. 386:
    None of these pieces are difficult or long; they require, however, a considerable amount of taste from the players who undertake to reveal their beauties, which, though not perhaps of the rarest order, are nonetheless many. Chief among their merits are a certain vein of originality —of quaintness, indeed, in the case of the two pieces first named—and a degree of refinement and grace that is very welcome. The Scherzo is mostly written in canon, and, though the chief theme is, to our thinking, too constantly present, is very pretty. The Oriental Romance is perhaps the most striking of the series. All these pieces may be recommended for teaching purposes—that is, if the pupil has musical feeling and a good instrument by which to reveal it. Otherwise, Clementi will be safer.

    From Rafael Kammerer's liner notes on the Hofman Veritas Records recording: "For sheer virtuosic bravura and unleashed power, Hofmann's performance of Sigismond Stojowski's little known Oriental is about as exciting as anyone could wish for. The piece itself is quite remarkable and wonderfully idiomatic. It is a worthy substitute for, and welcome relief from, Balakirew's Islamey."


Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded by LS, Desmar IPA 115, 1976
  • No. 2 recorded by Józef Hofman, who kept the piece in his concert repertoire for over 40 years. A recording of the live performance of the April 7, 1938 Casimir Hall Recital at the Curtis School of Music is found on Veritas Records VM 101: New York, 1967; LOC, PR.
  • No. 2 recorded by Irena Szynkorek for PR, R II 93910-B, 1960


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Opus 11: Piêæ Pie¶ni / Cinq mélodies (1895) - "Comtesse Anna Branicka née Comtesse Potocka"

Orchestration:

  • Polish Poems by Adam Asnyk; translated into French by Stéphan Bordèse

Movements:

  • No. 1. Letni wieczór - Soir d'eté
  • No. 2. Wêdrowa³o sobie s³onko - Le Soleil emplit la voûte
  • No. 3. Nie bêdê ciê rwa³a - Pourquoi te cueillir
  • No. 4. Ach, jak mi smutno - Pleure mon âme
  • No. 5. Siedzi ptaszek na drzewie - Sur le branche l'oiseau

Sources and Editions:

  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig, 1895: BJ, BNP, LOC
  • Schott, Mainz, 1910: USC (copy with ZS dedication to Sembrich, original ZLSC)
  • Manuscript copies of No. 5: ZLSC, BNW
  • Manuscript copies of nos. 1 & 4: ZLSC
  • Nos. 1, 3 & 5 recorded by Wis³awa Æwikliñska, soprano, for PR, PA-2097 G, 1971


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Opus 12: Danses humoresques pour piano (1893)

Movements:

  • *No.1 Polonaise - Théodore Jefowicki
  • No.2 Valse - Ladislas Mickiewicz
  • *No.3 Mazurka - Sophie Gabryszewska
  • No.4 Cracovienne - Louis Morelowski
  • No.5 Mazurka - Antoinette Szumowska
  • No.6 Cosaque Fantastique - Princess Catherine Stourdza

Sources and Editions:

  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig, 1893-1894 (edited by C.P. Scott): LOC, WU, BNW nos. 1,3,5 and 6, BJ nos. 1,2,3, and 5; USC No. 4
  • No. 3 published in London by Augener's Edition, n.d.: USC
  • No. 2 published in Philadelphia by Theodore Presser in 1893: USC


Recordings:

  • No. 2 recorded for Ampico (piano roll) Recordings by Mischa Levitzki 5742 also 10027, later released on an excellent Ampico reproducing piano recording entitled Mischa Levitzki Plays Beethoven, Mendelssohn and Brahms, Klavier Records KS-H6, North Hollywood, California: 1970
  • No. 2 recorded by Herma Merth for Artrio-Angelus (piano roll) 8103
  • No. 2 recorded by LS, Carnegie Hall Recording Co., Station WNYC, 78-RPM: January 12, 1947, ZLSC
  • No. 2 recorded by LS, Desmar IPA 115, 1976
  • No. 2 recorded by Zygmunt Lisicki for PR, 88716-B, 1957
  • No. 5 recorded by Michael von Zadora for Welte-Mignon (piano roll) 3655, ca. 1920-21.


Remarks:

    Review of No. 6: "Pianists who wish to add a striking and characteristic piece to their repertory may be recommended to purchase this composition. It requires a firm touch and spirited style for its effective performance, but presents no exceptional executive difficulties." The Musical Times (January 1, 1895): 30.


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Opus 13: Sonata in G Major for piano and violin (1893) - "A mon cher Maître Ladislas Zelenski"

Movements:

  • Allegro non troppo
  • Allegretto capriccioso
  • Thème varié

Sources and Editions:

  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig, 1894: BJ, CC, CPL, EAST, LOC, WU, USC (listed on copyright as H. B. Stevens & Co.)
  • Schott, Mainz, n.d.: USC
  • NYPLPA, SAM


Remarks:

    From a July 1, 1893 concert review from The Musical Times (p. 409) that included music by Paderewski, Tchaikovsky, ¯eleñski, Moszkowski and Stojowski: "The only piece of any length, however, was a Sonata in D (sic!) for pianoforte and violin, from Mr. Stojowski's own pen, in which he was assisted by his compatriot, Mr. Górski. It is a bright and animated work in three movements, of which the last, a theme with variations, is the cleverest, Slavonic character being perceptible throughout its phraseology."

    The Paris correspondent of the Warsaw daily Kurjer Warszawski wrote in a review of the sonata that it should be named the Peasant (Chlopska) Sonata, because of the composition's opening theme. Based on an undated press clipping in the Paderewski Archives, 570 No. 56, at the Archiwum Akt Nowych (AAN) in Warsaw.


Recordings:

    Recorded by Lidia Kmitowa, violin, and Jerzy Lefeld, piano for PR, 94165, 1959


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Opus 14: Dumka (c. 1910) - Sophie Gabryszewska

Sources and Editions:

  • Gebethner & Wolff, Warsaw, 1911: BNW, PR (with wrong opus No. 17)

Remarks:

    The only work by Stojowski that was first published in Poland; printed as Op. 17.
    Stojowski wrote two other works that bore the title Dumka: an unpublished work for voice and chamber orchestra and another solo piano piece without opus number, but published in 1945 by G. Schirmer in NY. There exists a set of orchestral parts for the former Dumka at ZLSC: Box 1, File 22; no full score or vocal part included.

    In the article, "Sigismond Stojowski and His Views on Piano Study," by William Armstrong that was published in The Etude in May 1906, the piano piece Dumka is listed as opus 14. This is probably the proper opus number for this work.

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Opus 15: Trois morceaux pour piano (1896)

Movements:

  • *No.1 Rêverie - Angela Anderson
  • *No.2 Intermezzo-Mazurka - Madame Henry Singer
  • No.3 Au Soir - Ivana Meedintiano

Sources and Editions:

  • Schott & Co., London, 1896: WU, BJ nos. 1 & 2, BNW No. 2
  • No. 2 published in the anthology Mazurkas by Biblioteka Narodowa, Warsaw, 1995.


Recordings:

    No. 2 recorded by Anon. Per. for The Orchestrelle Coy. (piano roll) AEOL L1048, Great Britain, 1903-08.


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Opus 16: Deux caprices pour piano (1898) - "A mon cher Maître Louis Diémer"

Movements:

  • No. 1 Allegretto moderato
  • *No. 2 Allegro molto

Sources and Editions:

  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig: 1898: BJ, BNW, WU
  • Schott & Co., London & Mainz, n.d. (copyright H.B. Stevens & Co. 1898): USC (No. 2)


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Opus 17(18): Sonata in A Major for piano and cello (September - October 1895) - "A mon très cher Maître I. J. Paderewski"

Movements:

  • Andante
  • Allegro
  • Allegro con fuoco

Sources and Editions:

  • H. B. Stevens, London, 1895-1896: ZLSC, Printed as Op. 17, in accordance with the manuscript
  • Hatzfeld, London & Leipzig & Leipzig, 1898 (printed as Op. 17; with copyright 1895 by H. B. Stevens Co.): BJ, CA Rare Book Room, NYPLPA, SAM, WU
  • Proof for the Hatzfeld edition corrected by the composer: ZLSC, USC (copy)
  • Schott, London, 190-: EAST
  • Manuscript score: USC (listed as Op. 17 by the composer)


Remarks:

Armstrong's 1906 list assigns Op. 18 to this sonata, listing Op. 17 as "Polish Songs." In accordance with the manuscript score and corrected proof in the composer's hand I assign to this work Op. 17, though its number on the list indicates the double opus designation.

A performance with the 24-year-old Pablo Casals and Stojowski took place in Paris at the Salle Erard on May 7, 1900. (Le Figaro, May 2, 1900 press clipping in Paderewski Archives, 570 no 43, AAN.) It would be Casals, along with pianist Harold Bauer, who recommended Stojowski to Frank Damrosch for the position of professor of piano at Damrosch's newly created Institute of Musical Art in NYC in 1905 (later incorporated into the Juilliard School of Music). The Stojowski family would also end up living in Casals's former ten-room apartment at 16 East 96th St. after giving up their four-story brownstone at 150 West 76th St.

The Sonata is more virtuosic for the pianist than it is for the cellist whose part maintains a cantabile character; the work is cyclic in form.


Recordings:

    Recorded by cellist Tomasz Strahl and pianist Edward Wolanin for PR, PC-1039, 1992.


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Opus 19: Cinq miniatures pour piano (1900)

Movements:

  • No. 1 Feuillet d'Album - Maude Hatzfeld
  • No. 2 Moment musical - Geneviève Emile Ollivier
  • *No. 3 Arabesque - Sallie F. Acken
  • No. 4 Barcarolle - Paulette Denisane
  • *No.5 Mazurka - Countess Antoine Potocka

Sources and Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1912: BNP, LOC, OSU, WU
  • Hatzfeld & Co., London, 1905: BNW (In this edition the order of works differ from the Heugel edition, and the Barcarolle is listed as Berceuse.), LOC nos. 3, 4 and 5

Recordings:

  • No. 5 recorded by ZS for Ampico (piano roll) Recording 60501H, and later recorded on radio on October 15, 1944, NY: Desmar IPA 115, 1976.

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Opus 20: Romance for violin and orchestra (1901) - Jacques Thibaud

Orchestration:

  • Vn-2.2.2.2-4.2.3.0-timp.cym-hrp-str

Sources and Editions:

  • C. F. Peters, Leipzig: 1901
  • Full score: DPL, MCM, UP
  • Full score and parts: ZLSC, FLP
  • Violin/Piano score: BJ, WU

Remarks:

  • Quiet opening and close; impassioned middle section.

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Opus 21: Symphony in D Minor (1898) - "I. J. Paderewski gewidmet"

Movements:

  • Andante mesto
  • Andante
  • Scherzo: Molto vivace
  • Finale: Allegro con fuoco, ma non vivace

Orchestration:

  • 3*.3*.3*.2-4.2.3.1-timp-harp-str

Sources and Editions:

  • C. F. Peters, Leipzig: 1901
  • Full score: LOC
  • Full score and parts: BBC, CBN, FLP, NYPLPA, SAM
  • Full score manuscript: ZLSC
  • Arrangement for Piano/Four Hands by Juliusz Spangler, 1902: BJ, BNW, LOC, WSU

Remarks:

    To be or not to be is written on the title page of the manuscript score. This quotation from Shakespeare was Stojowski's anonymous identification code for submitting the composition to the jury of the Paderewski Competition in Leipzig. The work won first prize (1,000 Rubles) on July 9, 1898 at the competition. Arthur Nikisch, director of the Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, was the head of the jury.
    According to Stefan ¦ledziñski in Zarys dziejów symfonii polskiej w XIX wieku, the first performance also took place in Leipzig at the Competition. However, Stojowski revised the last movement, and the first performance of this revised version took place with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra and the Czech conductor Josef Rebicek (1844-1904), on November 15, 1900, in the capital's Beethoven-Saal. The first Polish performance took place at the inaugural concert of the newly formed Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra with Emil M³ynarski conducting on November 5, 1901. Carnegie Hall was the concert venue for the American premiere with the New York Philharmonic playing an all-Stojowski program on March 1, 1915, conducted by Josef Stransky. This concert marked the first time in the orchestra's history that an entire program was dedicated to the music of only one Polish composer.

    The following program notes are an English translation of Charles Malherbe's notes which appeared in a program of the Paris Colonne Orchestra. The English version appeared on pp. 739-740 of the Boston Symphony Orchestra Program of January 16 & 17, 1920, Pierre Monteux, conducting; Philip Hale was the author of the descriptive notes.

    In spite of his leaning towards the national idioms, of which he has made ample use in his minor works, the composer of this symphony, in attempting the largest form of instrumental music, evolved along the traditional lines and most universal in its appeal, has refrained from what may be termed 'genre-music.' Barely the theme of the last movement with its proud, chivalrous character, especially when accompanied by some characteristic rhythmical figures in the bass, carries a suggestion of Poland. The work, voluntary sober in harmony and instrumentation, maintains in formal structure the main lines of the classical symphony. Nor did the composer choose to deprive himself of that source of riches and variety which came to the classical symphony from the use of different themes for the different movements. But if every movement possesses its own themes, a sort of unity is attempted by the recurrence of some themes, more or less modified, but always recognizable, in the various movements. So, for instance, the theme of the finale is announced in the slow movement, where it breaks in twice upon the tender mood by a dramatic appeal from the horns. In the scherzo, again, the main theme of the first movement suddenly emerges, in a subdued and altered form, from the bubble of the swiftly moving runs, shakes and tremolos. The whole movement is dipped in a phantastic atmosphere, which suggests hustling and dancing elfs (sic!) in a moonlit dance. It has been described by foreign critics as an effective bit of orchestra writing and has often been played separately, namely, by Mr. Arthur Nikisch. There is no programmatic pretense to this symphony, to which, however, Hamlet's 'to be or not to be' might serve as a motto. In the opening bars a bass-clarinet, like some enigmatic personage, voices the second subject in a sort of reflective mood, and the whole movement, with its sombre and violent main theme and its alternatives of light and shade, seem to depict the struggle between the 'to be or not to be' - until the final assertion of the triumph of light.

    Both Nikisch and M³ynarski were known to have separately programmed the Symphony's brilliant scherzo on concerts.

Recordings:

  • Recorded for PR, 95732 A: The National Polish Radio Orchestra in Katowice (WOSPR): Wlodzimierz Ormicki - conductor, 1962
  • Recorded for PR, PB-5284: The Polish Radio & TV Orchestra in Cracow; Zbigniew Chwedczuk - conductor, 1983

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Opus 22: Concerto in G Minor for violin and orchestra (1899?) - "A monsieur Ladislas Górski"

Movements:

  • Allegro deciso
  • Andante non troppo
  • Allegro giocoso

Orchestration:

  • vn-2.2.2.2-4.2.3.0-timp-hp-str

Sources and Editions:

  • Arthur P. Schmidt, Leipzig: 1908
  • Full score: HVU, LOC, ZLSC, USC (copy)
  • Full score and parts: BJ, FLP
  • Violin/Piano score: BJ, CLE, UMC, WU, ZLSC

Remarks:

  • The score features the following dedication to W³adys³aw Górski: "A monsieur Ladislas Gorski, au maître - collaborateur, au premier interprète, témoignage de reconnaissance artistique pour le précieux concours qu'il m'a prêté lors de la composition de cet ourage."

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*Opus 23: Rhapsodie symphonique pour piano et orchestre (1900) - Harold Bauer

Orchestration:

  • Pno-3*.3*.2.2-4.2.3.0-timp.perc (4)-hp-str

Sources and Editions:

  • C. F. Peters, Leipzig: 1904-1907
  • Full score: CLP, FLP, LOC, NYPLPA
  • Set of parts: ?
  • Arrangement for Piano Four Hands by composer: BJ, CLP, BNW

Remarks:

    The first performance was with the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra with the composer performing and Josef Rebicek (Rebicek) conducting at the Beethoven-Saal on November 15, 1900. (Taken from a review of the Berlin concert in Le Figaro on November 19, 1900, Paderewski Archives, 570 No. 46, AAN.) This is probably the same work as the Polish Fantasy [Fantazja polska], which one year later won the 250-ruble second prize (no first prize given) for the best composition for soloist and orchestra at the Count Zamoyski Competition in Warsaw, on October 20, 1900. (See: Echo Muzyczne i Teatralne, October 19, 1901.) If this is not the case, then Stojowski withdrew the Fantasy from his catalogue.

    In January 1902, the composer performed the work (Fantazja polska) for the first time in Poland with the Warsaw Philharmonic. Stojowski performed the work with the London Symphony Orchestra in June 1908 with Emil M³ynarski conducting and later with the New York Symphony Society at the New Theatre on Sunday afternoon, March 19, and again at Carnegie Hall on December 1, 1911, with Walter Damrosch conducting both concerts. There was another performance at the Boston Opera on January 26, 1913, and later performances in the 1920's and 30's with such orchestras as the Buffalo Philharmonic and San Francisco Symphony Orchestras.

    The work begins and ends in D Major but passes through many keys during its five sections which are the following:

    • 1. Andante con moto
    • 2. Allegro moderato
    • 3. Allegro vivace e giocoso /quasi mazurka/
    • 4. Poco maestoso
    • 5. Molto vivace

    The piece is based on two themes. The introductory first theme is heard at the very outset of the piece played in succession by the English horn, oboe, flute and piano, while the second theme - which dominates the entire composition - is first heard in the second section played by the flute and oboe.

    The following analytical notes are from the Sunday afternoon, June 7, 1908 concert program of the London Symphony Orchestra at Royal Albert Hall. Emil M³ynarski conducted and the composer was the soloist.

    The Rhapsodie Symphonique begins with an introductory movement, Andante con moto, which admirably fulfils its purpose by exciting expectation. This is accomplished at the outset by a solo passage for the cor anglais, and ten bars later by the entrance of the pianoforte, also without orchestral support. This part gradually increases in importance, growing more florid, and ultimately working-up to a climax crowned with the impressive statements in full chords, accompanied by arpeggi, of the first phrase of the principal subject of the Allegro moderato; but before this is commenced the pianoforte has a cadenza consisting chiefly of a series of shakes. On the Allegro moderato being reached, its chief subject is announced by the oboe and bassoon, supported by pizzicato chords from the strings. When the solo-instrument re-enters, it is with a series of double trills, which lead to its emphatic delivery of the principal theme. After this, animation prevails, the music becoming joyous in nature, albeit the second subject-matter is flowing and legato. The clever manner in which the composer has treated the characteristic phrases of this thematic material will be noticed, for the design is clear and the scoring picturesque. Attention may be drawn, however, to an effective passage of song-like suggestiveness for the 'celli and the ingenious combination of themes in the Molto vivace, which brings the work to a brilliant conclusion.

Recordings:

  • CD Recording: ABC Classics 465 424-2; Pianist Ian Munro with the Tasmanian Symphony Orchestra, David Porcelijn - conductor; Vol. 1 of Virtuoso Works for Piano and Orchestra: Australia, 2001.

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Opus 24: Polnische Idyllen für das Pianoforte / Polish Idylls for Piano (1901) - "Eduard Risler freundschaftlich zugeeignet"

Movements:

  • No. 1 Einsamleit - Solitude
  • No. 2 Auf zur Ernte - L'appel de moissoneurs
  • No. 3 Dorfcoquette - Coquette de Village - The Village Flirt
  • No. 4 Tanz-Vision - Vision de danse - Vision of the Dance
  • No. 5 Fest-Nachklänge - Souvenirs de fête

Sources and Editions:

  • C. F. Peters, Leipzig, 1901: BJ, BNW, LOC, NYPLPA, WU
  • Entire suite arranged by Arnold Rezler (b. 1909) for small orchestra. Score and parts: PR 1.1.1.1.-1.1.1.0.-timp-perc-pn-str
  • No. 4 Vision of the Dance (Wizja Taneczna) arranged for orchestra by Micha³ Baranowski (1935-1963), former director of the Polish Radio Symphony Orchestra in Katowice (Silesia). Score and parts: CBN 2.2.2.2-2.2.2.0-timp-str
  • No. 1 also appeared in the December 1970 issue of the Clavier. Reissued in 1993 by MO: SMU.
  • No. 3 arranged for harmonium by Sigfrid Karg-Elert (1877-1933)
  • Nos. 4 and 5 (Wizja Taneczna and Po kiermaszu) arranged by Stanis³aw Szpinalski for piano and published by PWM in 1952: BJ, BNW, USC

Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded by LS, Desmar IPA 115, 1976.
  • No. 1 recorded by Nina Sapiejewska for PR, R II P-4844-B, 1979
  • Nos. 1 & 3 recorded by Lidia Kozubek, Neoromantic Polish Piano Music, Pronit SX1433
  • Nos. 1 & 3 recorded by Lidia Kozubek for PR, R-II P5219-C, 1981
  • No. 3 recorded by the ZS for Ampico (piano roll) Recordings 67863H
  • No. 3 recorded by Boris Goldovsky, Allegro Royale 1402, c. 1955
  • No. 4 recorded by Regina Smendzianka for PR, R II 91314-A, 1958
  • Orchestral version recorded for PR, PA-5693: The Polish Radio & TV Orchestra in Cracow, Missona - conductor, 1977
  • Orchestral version recorded for PR, 98253 D: The Polish Radio Orchestra in Cracow, Stanis³aw Has - conductor, date ?
  • Orchestral version of No. 3 recorded for PR: R II P-4454-A: The Polish Radio Orchestra in Bydgoszcz, Arnold Rezler - conductor, 1953

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Opus 25: Romantische Stücke für das Pianoforte (1902) - "Frau Sadi Fuller Burchard in verehrungs- voller Freundschaft zugeeignet"

Movements:

  • No.1 Geständniss - Confidence
  • No. 2 En valsant
  • No. 3 Idylle
  • No. 4 Baracole
  • No. 5 Frülingserwachen - Spring's Awakening

Sources and Editions:

  • C. F. Peters, Leipzig: 1902: CAM, HVU, LOC, NYPLPA, PR

Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded by LS, Desmar IPA 115, 1976

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Opus 26: Quatre morceaux pour piano / Vier Stücke (1903)

Movements:

  • *No.1 Mélodie - Jeanne Des Fossez
  • *No.2 In tempo di Minuetto - Sadi Burchard
  • *No.3 Chant d'amour - Julia Appleton Fuller
  • *No.4 Thème cracovien varié - Marie Panthès-Kutner

Sources and Editions:

  • C.F. Peters, Leipzig (fingering by Adolf Ruthard), 1903: BJ, BNW, CAM, LOC, NYPLPA, WU
  • No. 3: EAST, TU
  • Manuscript for No. 3: USC
  • Manuscript for No. 2, 3, 4: ZLSC; No. 2, 4 at USC (copy)
  • Editions of No. 3:
    • G. Schirmer, NY: 1908. Composer's fingering. English subtitle Love Song ,EAST, LOC, NU, USC
    • Bendix Publishing Co, Lincoln, Nebraska: 1920 & 1940, CSU
    • B. F. Wood Co., Boston: c. 1920, with wrong notes in the left hand in m. 9, ZLSC, USC
    • Carl Fischer, NY: 1922, edited by Hans Semper, ZLSC
    • Theodore Presser, Philadelphia: 19--, ZLSC
    • Willis Music, Cincinnati: 1984, edited and fingered by Duncan Stearns, LOC
    • Chant d'amour was arranged for chamber orchestra by Gottfried Huppertz, C. F. Peters, Leipzig: 1930
    • Score and parts: BBC and an incomplete set of parts at CAM
    • Another orchestral arrangement of Chant d'amour under the Polish title Pie¶n mi³o¶ci was made in 1951 by Arnold Rezler. 1.1.1.1.-1.1.1.0.-timp-perc-pn(hp)-str [Score and parts: PR]

Remarks:

    Krehbiel, H. E.: Analytical Notes on Mr. Paderewski's Programmes; (American Tour of 1907-1908): Paderewski Archives 258, AAN (also in ZLSC, copy at PMC):
    Regarding Chant d' amour: The piece is in the key of G-flat, and is marked by a formal feature of an original nature: The principal melody dies away in a cadenza in D-flat which leads to a middle part of a duet-like character, which, after working itself up to an impassioned climax, gives way to a return of the first theme by means of the same cadenza, this time in G-flat."

Recordings:

  • No. 3 recorded by Anon. Per. on Aeolian (piano roll) T 20844, London, ca. 1905 and for The Orchestrelle Coy. AEOL 75929, London, 1905-08.
  • No. 3 recorded by ZS on Ampico (piano roll) Recordings 63923H, January 1925.
  • No. 3 recorded by Rudolph Ganz on Duo-Art (piano roll) 5525.
  • No. 3 recorded by Carl Friedberg on Triphonola (piano roll) 50881
  • No. 3 recorded by Paderewski in December 1926 on Vic 6633. Currently available on Pearl GEMM 9943.
  • No. 3 recorded by Nina Sapiejewska for PR, PB-633A
  • No. 3 recorded in an arrangement by Liberace and the George Liberace Orchestra on the album Moonlight Sonata, Columbia CL764 (1955).
  • No. 3 (arrangement by Rezler) recorded for PR, R II 81226: Polish Radio Orchestra in Bydgoszcz, A. Rezler - conductor, 1953
  • No. 4 is based on the delightful Polish folk song Pobudka Krakusów ("Bartoszu, Bartoszu")
  • No. 4 recorded by LS, Carnegie Hall Recording Co., Station WNYC, January 12, 1947, 78-RPM, ZLSC
  • A revised version of No. 4 recorded on radio by ZS, October 15, 1944, NY: Desmar IPA 115, 1976
  • No. 4 recorded for PR, 88716 B


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Opus 27: Fantaisie for trombone and piano (1905) - "A mon cher Maître Mr. Théodore Dubois, Directeur du Conservatoire de Paris"

Sources and Editions:

  • Evett et Schaefer, Paris, 1905: ZLSC
  • PWM, Cracow, 1953: BJ, BNW, WU
  • Leduc, Paris, 1947 & 1953
  • Leduc, Paris, 1967: ASU, EAST, SMU
  • International Music Co. (edited by Keith Brown), NY, 1972: ASU, LOC, MSM
  • Concours du Conservatoire National de Musique de Paris (Année 1905)
  • Arranged for trombone and orchestra by Arnold Rezler. Trb-2.2.2.2-4.2.0.0-timp.cym-str
  • Manuscript Score and parts: PR
  • Manuscript score: BNW

Remarks:

    Many subsequent editions of the work published in Paris, New York, Moscow and Warsaw. Several commercial recordings exist. Most major American universities with schools of music have copies in their libraries. Frequently found on required repertoire lists for trombonists pursuing a DMA. The 1953 Polish edition also includes a transcription of the Fantaisie for viola by Mieczys³aw Szaleski.

Recordings:

  • Recorded by Leon Piwkowski for PR, 93482-B, 1961
  • Recorded by Roman Siwek for PR, P-5449-C, 1982
  • Recorded by Christian Lindberg for BIS CD-298 The Romantic Trombone, Germany: 1985
  • Orchestra version recording for PR, 93639-A, Leon Piwkowski - trombonist, The Polish Radio Orchestra in Bydgoszcz, Arnold Rezler - conductor, 1977

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Opus 28: Two Mazurkas for piano (1908)

Movements:

  • No.1 Mazurka fantastique - Agnes Johnson Holden
  • No.2 Mazurka brillante - Barbara de Chlapowska

Sources and Editions:

  • Arthur R. Schmidt, Leipzig, 1908: BNW, EAST, LOC, WU

Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded in 1996 by Véronique Briel, Pologne Romantique, Warsaw: DUX 0265 and also for PR PC 886

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Opus 29: Auf Sturm und Stille for piano (190-)

Movements:

  • No. 1 Ballade - Adele Aus der Ohe
  • No. 2 Aufschwung - Essor - Mark Hamburg
  • No. 3 Zwielicht - Crépuscule - Twilight - Ethel Parrish
  • No. 4 Capriccio - Joseph Lhévinne
  • No. 5 Serenade - Mary Ruth Lockwood
  • No. 6 Valse - Impromtu - Theodore Hardt

Sources and Editions:

  • C. F. Peters, Leipzig, 1908: LOC, WU, PR
  • No. 3 arranged for harmonium by Sigfrid Karg-Elert

Recordings:

  • No. 5 recorded by the composer on Ampico (piano roll) Recordings 111001K, November 1921
  • No. 6 recorded by the composer on Ampico (piano roll) Recordings 62463H, October 1923

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Opus 30: Trois esquisses pour piano (1908)

Movements:

  • No.1 Amourette de Pierrot - Rudolph Ganz
  • No.2 Feuilles mortes / Autumn Leaves - Anna G. Lockwood
  • No.3 Près du ruisseau / By the Brookside Hedvige de Wierzbicka

Sources and Editions:

  • Arthur P. Schmidt, Leipzig, 1908: LOC, WU; UTA, USC No. 1; BNW No. 2; ASU, EAST, ICA No. 3
  • Second edition, copyright 1936 Sigismond Stojowski: USC (copy)

Recordings:

  • No. 1 recorded by Rudolph Ganz for Welte (piano roll) 3904
  • No. 3 By the Brookside was one of Paderewski's favorite and most frequently played encores. Recorded by Paderewski on December 1926 for Vic 1426. Currently available on Pearl GEMM CD 9943.

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Opus 31: Concertstüke in D Major for cello and orchestra (1915) - "à Monsieur Willem Willeke"

Orchestration:

  • 3(3rd alt. picc.).3*.2.2-4.2.3.0-timp.perc (1)-hp-str

Sources and Editions:

  • Manuscript: Willem Willeke Collection, Williams College
  • First Edition: Heugel & Cie., Paris: 1922
  • Full score and cello/piano score as well as a set of Photostat parts marked Proprieté de la Maison Menestre: ZLSC
  • cello & piano score: GAM (photocopy), NYPLPA, ZLSC, LOC, PWM

Remarks:

    It is a one-movement piece. World premiere took place on the 1915 monographic concert of Stojowski's music at Carnegie Hall with the New York Philharmonic. Willem Willeke was the cellist and Josef Stransky conducted.


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Opus 32: Prologue, Scherzo & Variations (Concerto No. 2 in A-flat Major for piano and orchestra) [summers of 1909 & 1910 at Chamonix] - "Au Maître Paderewski, Homage d'affection reconnaissante"

Orchestration:

  • pno-3(3rd alt. picc.).3*.2.2-4.2.3.0-timp.perc-hp-str


Sources and Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris: 1914
  • Full score: BNP, LOC
  • Full score and parts: FLP
  • Manuscript sketches (16 pages) and full score: ZLSC
  • Arranged for two pianos by the composer: EAST, LOC, NYPLPA, WU
  • Manuscript of the arrangement for two pianos: ZLSC


Remarks:

    First performance took place with Stojowski playing and Arthur Nikisch conducting the London Symphony Orchestra on 23 June 1913 in Queens Hall, London.

    The Second Concerto had its American premiere with Stojowski playing with the New York Philharmonic under the direction of Josef Stransky on March 1, 1915. Victor Herbert, Józef Hofman, Franz Kneisel, Mischa Elman and Leopold Godowsky were present in the audience (New York Herald, March 2/3, 1915). At the beginning of March 1916, Paderewski performed the work under the title Prologue, Scherzo & Variations first with the New York Symphony conducted by Walter Damrosch at Carnegie Hall on March 2 & 4 and one week later with the Boston Symphony Orchestra with Karl Muck conducting at Orchestra Hall on March 10 & 11. On the New York program the first American performances of Elgar's Polonia were given. There was such a demand for tickets for the March 4 concert, that an open dress rehearsal had to be added on March 2. Paderewski also broke the Symphony Society's rule about not allowing soloists to play encores at orchestral concerts. After taking a dozen bows, Paderewski finally sat down at the piano and played Stojowski's Chant d' amour as an encore. On Sunday afternoon, November 16, 1924, the composer would once more play the concerto with the New York Philharmonic Society under the baton of Willem van Hoogstraten (1884-1965) at Carnegie Hall, with the sixth variation cut from the last movement.

    Stojowski also performed the concerto with the Warsaw Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Jerzy Bojanowski on October 4, 1929, the opening concert of the 1929-1930 season. Unfortunately, the performance was an artistic scandal. However, it was not the fault of Stojowski, but of the conductor and/or orchestra. In the October 5 edition of the Kurjer Poranny, music critic Zbigniew Domaniewski wrote that Bojanowski did not know the score, that he got completely lost a couple of times, and that the orchestra was totally disorientated and played as though they were sight reading at a rehearsal. Like Stojowski, Bojanowski (1893-1983) also immigrated to America. Prior to his emigration, Bojanowski was a conductor of the Warsaw Philharmonic (1928-1932). He first settled in Chicago in 1932, where he came to conduct—at the request of the Polish government—the Chicago Symphony Orchestra at the Chicago World's Fair and then remained as the cultural attaché at the Polish Consulate. In the early 1940's, he relocated to Milwaukee, where he spent the remainder of his life.

    Hinson lists playing time as 32 minutes, while a review of 1916 Paderewski performance is given at 45 minutes. Jonathan Plowright's recording is listed as 33'01. In the Note pour l'exécution found in the full score, the composer writes that since the length of this work is longer than the usual piano concerto, certain cuts can be made. Variations nos. I, VI and or IX may be omitted. If Variation IX is cut, then the seven-bar transition from Variation VIII to IX supplied by the composer must be played.


Recordings:

  • Recorded by Jonathan Plowright and the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, Martyn Brabbins conducting, for Hyperion Records CDA67314, 2002.


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Opus 33: Six Songs for voice and piano - Euphonies (1911) - Marcela Sembrich

Movements:

  • Polish poems by Kazimierz Tetmajer; French translation by Maurice Chassang
  • No. 1 Où va ton rêve? - Where is Thy Dream?
  • No. 2 Parle de grâce! - Speak Once Again
  • No. 3 Si tu étais un lac insondable - Wert Thou the Lake
  • No. 4 Comme un luth sonore, ô brise- On My Heart, Ye Wandr'ing Breezes
  • No. 5. Adieu - Farewell
  • No. 6. Invocation - Cloudless, Ye Skies


Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1911: BN, NYPLPA
  • G. Schirmer, New York: 1921 under the title of Euphonies with French and English texts;
  • English translations of the Tetmajer poems by Henry Grafton Chapman: LOC, TU, ASU Nos. 1, 3, 4, 5 & 6


Recordings:

  • Nos. 1 & 3 recorded by Irena Lewiñska, soprano, R II 88716-D (1957) & R II 88716-E (1953)


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Opus 34?

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Opus 35: Trois études de concert pour piano (1912) - Joseph Hofman

Movements:

  • No. 1 C Major
  • No. 2 F-sharp Major
  • No. 3 A Minor


Sources and Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1912: LOC, WU
  • Manuscript score: USC


Recordings:

  • No. 2 recorded by Anon. Per. for Aeolian Co. AEOL T 30316, London, 1905.


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Opus 36: Poème d'été [Quatre morceaux pour piano] (1910?) - "To Mrs. George Montgomery Tuttle in grateful friendship"

Movements:

  • No.1 Rêves / Dreams
  • No.2 Rayons et reflets / Rays & Reflections
  • No.3 Fleurettes / Flowerets
  • No.4 Bruissements / Forest Breezes -


Remarks:

    No. 4 bears an inscription: "And all at once it seems as tho' the wood were reeling / Above, like flying sparks, a swarm of bees is wheeling." [H. Bouvele, Le Royaume de la Terre]


Sources and Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris, c. 1914: WU
  • G. Schirmer, New York, 1910: EAST, NYPLPA
  • G. Schirmer, New York, 1912: ZLSC


Recordings:

  • No. 3 recorded by LS, Desmar IPA 115, 1976


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Opus 37: Sonata No. 2 in E Major for piano and violin (July 23, 1911) - Artur Argiewicz

Movements:

  • Allegro affetuoso
  • Intermezzo - Poco vivace scherzando
  • Arietta molto sostenuto
  • Allegro giocoso


Sources and Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1912: BJ, BN, EAST, LOC, NYPLPA, SAM, USC
  • Manuscript score: USC
  • Second and third movements (Arietta and Intermezzo) published by PWM in a version edited by Eugenia Umiñska (Cracow: PWM, 1953, 1988): BJ, BNW, LOC, NYPLPA, WU, PR, USC


Remarks:

The dedicatee was a violinist on the faculty of the Institute of Musical Art in New York. Piece composed in Campobello. The Musical Courier reports Georges Enesco playing Sonata No. 2 "adequately" with the composer in Paris on June 10, 1913.


Recordings:

  • recorded by Henryk Tritt for PR, PB-7442, 1987


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Opus 38: Fantaisie pour piano (1911) - Maurice Moszkowski

Sources and Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1912: WU, USC (copy)
  • Manuscript score: ZLSC


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Opus 39: Aspirations. Poèmes pour piano (1914)

Movements:

  • No.1 Vers l'azur (prélude) - Mehr Licht (Goethe)
  • No.2 Vers la tombe (élégie) - Donald Jonson
  • No.3 Vers la caprice (intermède) - Elenore Altman
  • No.4 Vers l'amour (romance) - Mr. Ch. L. Scudder
  • No.5 Vers la joie (rhapsodie) - Ernest Schelling


Sources and Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1914: LOC, WU, BJ No. 1; USC (copy)
  • Manuscripts of nos. 2-3: ZLSC
  • Manuscripts of No. 4-5: USC
  • No. 1 reissued in 1988 by MO with the wrong opus number, viz., op. 30, instead of op. 39; UMK, SMU.


Remarks:

    No. 1 performed by Józef Hofman and Ernest Schelling at 1916 recital in Carnegie Hall. No. 3 is in D Phrygian mode. No. 4 was recorded by composer. The work borders on impressionism.


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Opus 40: A Prayer for Poland, Cantata for soprano and bass, mixed chorus, orchestra & organ (Summer 1915, Cragsmoor, NY) - "To my beloved Mother, Ukochanej Matce"

Orchestration:

  • 3*.3*3*.3*-4.4.3.1-timp-perc-celesta-org-sop. and bar. soloists- chorus SATB-hp-str
    and optional antiphonal brass 0.4.4.0 used to support the organ where needed


Sources and Editions:

  • G. Schirmer, New York: 1915
  • Piano/Vocal Score: BJ, EAST, HVU, LOC, NYPLPA, UM, copy at NL, USC
  • Full score only in manuscript: ZLSC
  • Piano/vocal manuscript: ZLSC
  • Text by Zygmunt Krasinski Modlitwa za Polskê (1839), English text by George Harris, Jr.


Remarks:

  • Modlitwa za Polskê (A Prayer for Poland) was first performed in New York on Tuesday, March 7, 1916, with the Schola Cantorum and the Symphony Society of New York under the direction of Kurt Schindler. Paderewski was in the audience. Soloists for the cantata included soprano Minnie Jovelli and baritone Bernado Olshansky (Bernard Olszañski). The program also included the first American performance of Sergei Rachmaninoff's cantata The Voice of Spring. The S³ownik Muzyków Polskich mistakenly gives March 6 as the date of this concert. Not only was that a busy week for Stojowski at Carnegie Hall, but one week later on Wednesday, March 15, Stojowski would again appear at Carnegie Hall, this time with Paderewski, Schelling and other prominent musicians of that time to give a gala benefit concert in aid of French musicians of the Paris Conservatoire, who were sufferers of the Great War. And, in between concerts at Carnegie Hall, Stojowski was present at the two Boston Symphony Orchestra performances of his Piano Concerto No. 2 at Orchestra Hall on March 10 and 11.


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Opus 41: [Two pieces for piano] (1922 & 1933)

Movements:

    No. 1 Intermède lyrique pour piano (1922) - dedicated to his wife, "A la Senorita Luisa Morales-Macedo"
  • No. 2 Scherzo-Caprice pour piano (1933) - Mildred Titcomb (Mrs. Williams M. Rains)

Sources and Editions:

  • No. 1 published by Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1922: LOC, OSU, WU
  • Manuscript score for No. 1 at ZLSC
  • No. 2 published by Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1933: LOC, WU;
  • Manuscripts of both works at Alphonse Leduc in Paris as well as ZLSC


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Opus 42: Variations et fugue sur un thème original pour piano (1923) - "A ma très chère femme"

Sources and Editions:

  • Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1923: LOC, WU


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Opus 43, No. 1 Romance for piano (1941?) - "to Phyllida Ashley Everingham"

Sources and Editions:

  • G. Schirmer, New York, 1941: LOC, Photocopy at ZLSC and USC
  • Manuscript score: ZLSC but with opus No. as Op. 41 No. 3

Recordings:

  • Recorded on radio by ZS in 1942, NY: Desmar IPA 115, 1976




Published Works Without Opus Numbers




A. Songs

  • A Stella - An Stella (c. 1890)
    French poem by P. R. Hirsch
    Schott, London:

  • Chanson de mer - Meereslied (c. 1890)
    French poem by Sully Prudhomme
    Schott, London:
    Both of the above songs were performed at the February 19, 1892 Berlin Philharmonic concert.

  • Euphonies - Ce furent là des heures douces - Greta Torpadie
    French poem by Viellé-Griffin
    Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1922: PC (Not to be confused with the song cycle Euphonies, Op. 33)

  • Krakowiak (Le Cracovien), En Route gai Cracovien (for tenor)
    Polish text by Edm. Wasilewski, French text by S. Bordése
    Hatzfeld., London, 1895: BJ
    Schott, Mainz, 1910: Listed in Hofmeister

  • La flûte muette
    French poem by P. R. Hirsch
    Schott, London: 1898

  • Serénade
    Polish text by Adam Asnyk; French translation by Maurice Chassang Patrz, patrz, oto wiosna - Viens, viens, le printemps râvi Heugel & Cie., Paris: 1913

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    B. Works for Piano

  • Cadenza for Beethoven's Concerto No. 3 in C minor
    Heugel & Cie., Paris: 1913: BNP, LOC

  • Deux Feuillets d' Album
    E. Ashdown, London: 1911

  • Dumka (1945) - Guiomar Novaes-Pinto
    G. Schirmer, New York:, 1945: ZLSC, LOC, USC

  • Sigismond Stojowski Album
    edited by Alec Rowley; Schott & Co., London: 1932
    Preface: "Those who value beauty will find herein a treasury of delight." An anthology that contains: 1. Mélodie, 2. Intermède, 3. Berceuse, 4. Gondoliera, 5. Rêverie

  • Lullaby / Cradle Song (1941)
    appeared in the anthology Homage to Paderewski published in 1941 by Boosey & Hawkes in London to mark the death of Ignacy Jan Paderewski. Based on the Peruvian folk song A larroro rito. In addition to Stojowski, the collection contains 15 other works by such composers as Béla Bartók, Maria Castelnuovo-Tedesco, Bohuslav Martinu, Darius Milhaud, Ernest Schelling, Jaromir Weinberger and others. Benjamin Britten misunderstood the commission and submitted his Mazurka Elegiaca, which did not make it into the anthology because it was scored for two pianos. It was published separately, however. The compositions by Britten and Bartók are the only two works which are currently in print. The anthology is available from B & H custom reprint service. Library copy at UM, USC. Manuscript score: ZLSC

  • Twelve Exercises for Strengthening the 3rd, 4th and 5th Fingers
    See: Alberto Jonás, Master School of Modern Piano Playing and Virtuosity. New York: Carl Fischer, 1922.


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    C. Works for Violin

  • Serénade for solo violin
    Heugel (collection Selecta No. 95), Paris: c. 1920
    This might be an arrangement of the Serénade from Opus 8, which was earlier arranged for violin by A. Kaiser and published by Schott in 1910.


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    D. Polish Song Collections

  • Chansons Polonaise
    Heugel & Cie., Paris, 1927: BNW, EAST, ICA, LOC
    Twenty Polish folksongs arranged for solo voice or unison chorus and piano as well as five Polish Christmas carols arranged for mixed chorus and piaNo. The latter are extremely beautiful. Polish, French and English texts.

  • Memories of Poland
    Marks Music, New York, 1937: BJ, BNW, LOC, NYPLPA, UMK, PR
    Twenty-seven Polish folksongs, patriotic and religious hymns arranged for solo voice or unison chorus and piano. Polish and English texts. The composer accompanies many of the songs with commentaries.




    Unpublished Works (Lost)




  • Cadenza for Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 4
    (Mentioned in composer's résumé in ZLSC).

  • Cello Sonata No. 2
    (mentioned in The New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians, 2001).

  • Fantazja polska (Polish Fantasy) for piano and orchestra
    In 1901, it won first prize at the Maurice Zamoyski competition in Warsaw. Based on Polish dance forms. Either Stojowski withdrew the work from catalogue or else this is another name for Rhapsodie symphonique, Op. 23, which was premiered a year earlier.

  • Intermezzi for piano
    (Mentioned in composer's Biographical Data).

  • Piano Quintet
    (mentioned in Groves, 2001); there is a short Piano Quartet, however, as well as sketches for a piano trio.

  • Romance for flute and piano
    (mentioned in Reiss and in composer's Biographical Data).

  • Serenade 'Rigandon' [sic!] for piano solo
    (Mentioned in the May 18, 1896 issue of Echo Muzyczne…, 264).

  • Three Songs
    set to the poetry of Edm. Wasilewski, including one entitled Miêdzy nami nic ne by³o (Mentioned in Echo Muzyczne i Teatralne [May 18, 1896], 264). This does not include the Krakowiak mentioned as one of the printed art songs.

  • Inca Themes for piano
    An arrangement of work by Peruvian composer Pablo Chávez Aguilar (1898-1950). A suite consisting of four movements in A-flat Major, F Minor, D Minor and E minor. Piece known to have been performed by LS at a Town Hall Recital on November 25, 1950.




    Unpublished Works in Manuscript in ZLSC




  • Ballade for orchestra
    (mentioned in Groves, 1937); 35 pages; Stojowski's first work for orchestra. Manuscript is marked in pencil "Op. 1."
  • 3*.3*.3*.2.-4.2.3.1.-timp.-harp-strings
  • Cantata Automne [Choeur à 4 parties, accompagnement d'orchestre] (May 1888) for mixed chorus and orchestra,
    French poem by Lamartine; manuscript of the seven-page piano vocal score exists in ZLSC.

  • Caprice-Étude pour le piano,
    4 pages, May 3, 1888; copy at USC

  • Dumka; for solo voice and chamber orchestra.
    Only orchestra parts exist, full score and solo vocal part missing.

  • Fugue de concours: Fugue du ton à quatre parties, 8 pages, Paris: July 25, 1889. Dedication: A Charles René, temoignage d'amitié et de reconnaissance

  • Mazurka in F Major for violin and orchestra
    (unfinished)

  • Piano Concerto No. 3 in F Minor
    (mentioned in Groves, 1937); Concerto pour piano avec accompagnement d'orchestre. 68 pages, missing pages 31-32

  • Piano Quartet
    4 pages

  • Scherzo for orchestra
    (this is the only movement from the Unfinished Second Symphony); Manuscript is marked in pencil "op. 10." Orchestration: 3*.3*.2.2.-4.2.3.1.-1.-timp-harp-strings

  • Symphony No. 2
    (mentioned in The Musical Courier, April 26, 1911); unfinished symphony - only the Scherzo exists - 42 pages

  • Six Musical Notebooks
    the sixth of which has the following juvenilia works. They are presented in the order as found in the manuscript:

  • Têsknota [Longing]
    song for high voice and piano, text by N. Zmichnowska, Ischl (?) Tochl (?): August 1884

  • Feuille d'Album, for piano
    (Andantino quasi allegretto, A-flat Major), August 1884

  • [Theme and (13) Variations]
    (Theme: Grave, G Major), February 1885

  • Trois morceaux en miniature, for piano,
    Composed in Cracow in May 1885
  • Petite marche (B-flat Major)
  • Petite Barcarolle (F-sharp Major)
  • Petit Scherzo (E-flat Major)
  • Niegodziwy [Wicked], song for voice and piano
    text by Rodocia (?), Cracow: March 1886
  • "Helenko, Helenko, ¿al szalony"
  • Szkoda [Pity], song for voice and piano
    text by Asnyk, Cracow: September 1886

  • Caprice, for piano
    (Allegro con fuoco - D Major), Cracow: September 1886

  • Phantaisie for piano
    (Andante sostenuto), Cracow: June 1886

  • Romance sans paroles pour violoncelle (no date)

  • The Chopin Mazurkas edited by Zygmunt Stojowski
    This is the last project the composer completed before his death in 1946. Each mazurka, which contained the artist's fingerings and pedaling, was also accompanied with a lengthy (over 50 single-spaced typewritten pages) commentary and analysis: ZLSC. In 1970, one of the Stojowski-edited mazurkas with commentary appeared in the American magazine Clavier, commemorating the centennial of Stojowski's birth.




    Unpublished Works In Other Locations


  • Mazurka in D Major and Polonaise in F-sharp Minor by Frederick Chopin
  • orchestrated by Zygmunt Stojowski for Ernest Schelling's 1915 musical pageant A Night in Poland.
  • Full score and parts (manuscript): PIASA
  • Orchestration: 2.1.2.1.-2.2.1.0-timp.perc-pNo.-str


  • pmj_bar


    Herter: The Life of Stojowski
    Stojowski's Performances with Orchestra
    Annotated Catalogue of Stojowski's Music
    Stojowski - Bibliography
    Stojowski on Paderewski
    Stojowski on Chopin's Impromptu
    Selected Reviews of Stojowski's Concerts
    Selected Program Notes on Stojowski
    Notes about the Authors
    PMJ - Current Issue
    PMJ - Archives


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    Copyright 2002 by Joseph A. Herter.
    Editor: Maja Trochimczyk. Assistant Editor: Linda Schubert.
    Publisher: Polish Music Center, Winter 2002.
    Design: Maja Trochimczyk & Marcin Depinski.
    Comments and inquiries by e-mail: polmusic@email.usc.edu