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The USC Graduate School

Graduate School Policies and Requirements

Admission

Admission to degree or certificate programs in the Graduate School is granted through the USC Office of Graduate Admission, which receives and processes all applications, evaluates credentials and issues notification letters. The Graduate School establishes and monitors the standards under which students are admitted for study in degree programs under its jurisdiction. Admission to the university, under the standards of the Graduate School, is determined by the Office of Graduate Admission on the recommendation of the appropriate academic department. The following are the basic requirements: (1) a Bachelor of Arts degree or its equivalent from an accredited college or university, comparable in standard to that awarded at USC; (2) satisfactory scores on the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE); (3) intellectual promise that indicates an ability to do acceptable graduate work; (4) strong personal qualifications, including good moral character. Credentials for admission must include a complete record of all previous college or university work.

It must be stressed that while every student must be qualified for admission to the Graduate School, the fact of qualification does not guarantee admission. Consequently, the higher an applicantís qualifications, the better the prospects of securing a place are likely to be.

Admission documents are reviewed by the applicantís prospective department. Applicants are advised that individual departments may establish additional admission standards, such as requiring the appropriate GRE Subject Test and letters of recommendation from professors in their major field to the chair of the appropriate department at USC. The applicant should contact the department in which graduate work is to be done for information on supplementary documents required. See the departmental sections of this catalogue.

The Graduate Record Examinations
As a supplement to other evidence of an applicantís preparation for successful graduate study, the General Test of the Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) is an integral part of the admission procedure. Individual departments may also require the appropriate Subject Test.

The GRE testing program changed significantly with the October 2002 test. The analytical portion of the GRE now requires a writing sample. The results are conveyed to any institution receiving an applicantís test results. Applicants should take the package of General Interest measures containing the Mathematical Reasoning or Quantitative Reasoning Test as appropriate for their intended program.

Test scores on the GRE that are more than five years old at the time of application are not accepted. Students are advised to repeat the GRE if they have not taken the test within five years.

Students who are not residents of the Los Angeles area should inquire at their own institutions concerning times and places the examinations are given. Residents of the Los Angeles area may apply for the examinations at the USC Testing Bureau.

Deadlines and Notification
The completed application for admission and all required supporting data should be submitted to the Office of Graduate Admission early in the semester preceding that in which the student intends to register. In the case of a student enrolled in the last semester of the baccalaureate program, all credentials, including evidence of work in progress, should be submitted.

Some departments only admit graduate students to begin study in the fall semester and require completed applications as early as December 1. Departmental deadlines are listed in the Application for Graduate Admission booklet. Those who wish to submit applications after the deadline should check with the intended major department first to insure that applications will be accepted. Applications received subsequent to closing dates will be considered for the next available semester.

Notification of an admission decision depends upon the method of application review used in each department. Some departments send an informal notice of departmental recommendation for admission; official notice of admission, however, is sent only by the USC Office of Graduate Admission.

Correspondence with department chairpersons or individual faculty members does not constitute admission. Only a letter from the Office of Graduate Admission grants official admission to a degree objective in the university.

Acceptance with a Degree Objective
Students will be admitted to the Graduate School with a specified degree objective. Admission to a degree objective and permission to enroll in the Graduate School does not imply that the student is or will be automatically guaranteed the right to continue in a degree program or to be a candidate for an advanced degree.

Candidacy for an Advanced Degree
Admission to graduate study does not imply admission to candidacy for an advanced degree and gives no right or claim to be so admitted. Candidacy is determined after the student has demonstrated by work done at this university the ability to do graduate work with originality and independence.

Classification of Admission Status
Students who have met all the basic admission requirements and filed all relevant documents with the Office of Graduate Admission are generally admitted to full graduate standing. Occasionally, applicants for admission may lack one of the qualifications listed above or may have difficulty producing appropriate documentation; such students may be conditionally admitted.

Conditional Admission
Conditional admission is a status for those students who have not yet met all requirements for admission to full graduate status or who have not filed all relevant documents with the office handling graduate admissions. See here for policies governing enrollment as a conditionally admitted student.

Limited Status Students
Some students may wish to enroll in graduate-level courses for personal satisfaction or professional enhancement without at the same time wishing to seek a graduate degree. Other students may wish to enroll while the formal application for graduate admission is being completed. Such students may obtain a special form from the Office of Academic Records and Registrar at the time of registration which will permit them to register in the classification limited status. See here for policies governing limited status enrollment.

Doctoral Admission with Advanced Standing
Some doctoral programs at USC admit students with Advanced Standing (entry with an appropriate completed graduate degree from an accredited institution).

General Requirements for Progressive Degree Programs

A progressive degree program enables a USC undergraduate to begin work on a masterís degree while completing requirements for the bachelorís degree. The degree may be in the same or different departments but should be in a similar field of study. Students in a progressive degree program must fulfill all requirements for both the bachelorís degree and the masterís degree except for the combined total number of units for the degrees. The masterís degree may be awarded simultaneously with but not before the bachelorís degree is awarded.

General Requirements for Graduate Degrees

The work for the masterís degree or for the Ph.D. degree is based upon the baccalaureate degree or its equivalent comparable in standard to that awarded at USC from a regionally accredited college or university. Many doctoral students, of course, will already have received a masterís degree.

University policies governing unit, grade point average and time limit requirements are stated in the University Policies section of this catalogue. Graduate students should also consult this section for policies on transfer of credit, concurrent enrollment, continuous enrollment, leaves of absence, readmission, and waiver and substitution of course requirements.

Unit Requirements
The course of study for the masterís degree must include at least 24 units in required and elective courses. In addition, students in a program requiring a thesis must register for four units of 594ab Masterís Thesis.

A minimum of 60 units of course work beyond the baccalaureate is required for the Ph.D. degree, including research courses and four units of 794ab Doctoral Dissertation. No more than 8 units of 794 may be received or applied toward the degree.

A minimum of 36 units of course work beyond the first graduate degree, exclusive of 794 Doctoral Dissertation, is required for doctoral degree students admitted with Advanced Standing. Additional course work may be required if deemed necessary by the studentís faculty. See Doctoral Admission with Advanced Standing.

Residence
Residency is a period of intensive study completed at USC. For the masterís degree a minimum of 20 units of course work applicable toward the degree must be completed on the University Park and/or Health Sciences campuses and/or at one of the universityís approved off-campus study centers.

For the Ph.D. degree a minimum of 24 units applicable toward the degree, exclusive of 794 Doctoral Dissertation, must be completed on the University Park and/or Health Sciences campuses. Internships, field work and other off-campus experiences do not count toward residency.

It is not intended that the Ph.D. degree be conferred as a certificate of residence, however faithful or extended, or as a certificate of the satisfaction of unit requirements, which are to be regarded as largely preliminary. It has been found that the scholastic requirements for the degree cannot be completed in less than the equivalent of three full years of work devoted wholly to graduate study and research with appropriate facilities and under university supervision.

Communication Skills Requirement
All candidates for advanced degrees awarded by the Graduate School must demonstrate the ability to communicate and transfer knowledge. The specific method(s) for satisfying this requirement will be established by each individual academic unit.

Exception to Graduate School Policy
Requests for exception to the policies and procedures governing Graduate School degree programs will be considered upon the submission of a general petition stating the specific request, supported by adequate reasons and information. The signatures and recommendation of the faculty advisor or committee chair and department chair are required.

Departmental Requirements

The requirements and regulations set forth in this portion of the catalogue are to be construed only as minimal requirements established by the Graduate School. In addition, the student is obligated to meet all the requirements established by the individual department as described in the departmental sections.

Advisement and Program of Study
Academic advisement of entering graduate students will be provided by a designated faculty member in the studentís home department. During the first semester of graduate enrollment a formal program of study should be developed and agreed upon in writing. This academic plan should include: (1) the sequence of required and elective courses, with a diversity of faculty instruction and a reasonable balance between course work and directed research appropriate for the degree; (2) evaluation of available transfer credit for application toward the degree; and (3) the schedule and procedures for departmental evaluation of the student. The program of study should be on file in the studentís department and may be modified in keeping with the studentís progress toward the degree objective. This will become the responsibility of the studentís guidance committee when it has been established.

Foreign Language/Research Tool Requirements
Although the Graduate School does not require a foreign language examination, some departments do have specific language requirements for their graduate programs.

The foreign language requirement is determined by the individual departments or schools, subject to approval by the University Committee on Curriculum. For the Ph.D. student, these requirements should be met well in advance of the qualifying examination. Permission to take the qualifying examination will not be given until the requirements have been met.

When proficiency in a foreign language or a research tool is required, the evidence attesting to proficiency may not be more than five years old. This regulation applies regardless of the form of the evidence.

For specific information, see Foreign Language/Research Tool Requirement under the appropriate department and program sections of this catalogue.

Academic Warning and Dismissal
Faculty advisors and departments take factors other than satisfactory grades and adequate GPAs into consideration in determining a studentís qualifications for an advanced degree. A studentís overall academic performance, specific skills and aptitudes, and faculty evaluations will be considered in departmental decisions regarding a studentís continuation in a masterís or doctoral degree program.

Satisfactory progress toward an advanced degree as determined by the faculty is required at all times. Students who fail to make satisfactory progress will be so informed by their department or committee chair or school dean. The faculty has the right to recommend at any time after written warning that a student be dismissed from a graduate program for academic reasons or that a student be denied readmission.

Theses and Dissertations

Submission of Theses and Dissertations
Candidates are required to submit their manuscripts to the Graduate School electronically as one PDF file for review by the thesis editor. Permission to submit electronically will be granted after all required documentation is first submitted in person to the Graduate School. Once the paperwork is reviewed and is complete, the candidate is cleared to submit the manuscript electronically.

Manuscripts submitted electronically without Graduate School permission will be rejected. Candidates have six months from the date on the approval of the masterís thesis or Ph.D. dissertation form to have their manuscript approved by the thesis editor. If the thesis or dissertation is not approved within the six-month period, a late submission fee of $100 will be assessed for each month thereafter. Manuscripts are reviewed and graduation paperwork is processed in the order that they are received. Candidates are strongly urged to submit their paperwork and manuscript as close to the date on the approval of the masterís thesis or Ph.D. form as possible. Candidates are also advised to submit as far in advance of the Graduate Schoolís deadline as possible.

Only electronic PDF versions of the manuscript will be accepted for review. The university does not provide copies of theses and dissertations.

Acceptance by the University
The university must accept all theses and dissertations in an approved, final and electronic form before graduation can be conferred. The candidateís committee must have approved all documents before submission to the Graduate School. After complying with the submission process described above, the student must remain in contact with the Graduate School during the corrections process.

At the time of submission, all manuscripts should be formatted and edited according to a recommended style manual and strict adherence to the Guidelines for Format and Presentation of Theses and Dissertations, available from the Graduate School, Grace Ford Salvatori Hall 315, or from the Graduate School Web site. The university thesis editor reviews the final electronic copy for conformance to university regulations, which takes precedence over all other style formats and issues. The editor does not function as a proofreader or copy editor. The final electronic version of the thesis or dissertation must comply with university guidelines, which are established to meet publication standards at ProQuest Information and Learning and at the university library.

Students with manuscripts that have not been proofread and/or do not conform to university regulations will be notified via email that their manuscript is not acceptable and that they must format the manuscript in compliance with university guidelines and resubmit it.

If the manuscript requires corrections, the student must make the corrections and upload an entirely new PDF version of the manuscript in the time allotted by the thesis editor. Students will not be permitted to simply mail or email a corrected version. The student must maintain contact with the Graduate School throughout the entire process to ensure completion. Electronic resubmission of a manuscript for a second review is also reviewed in the order in which it is received. No more than two reviews will be granted per semester, and when time constraints prevail at each deadline, the number of reads possible will depend upon the availability of the thesis editor. Therefore, all students must allow adequate time to make any and all corrections, and these corrections must be approved by the thesis editor before a thesis or dissertation will be accepted by the university for graduation.

Schedule of Deadlines
The Graduate School provides a schedule of specific dates for completing the various requirements to qualify the student for the masterís or Ph.D. degree in the corresponding semester. Despite the date of submission, a student must complete all corrections to the manuscript as specified by the thesis editor, as well as all verification of documentation and necessary paperwork before the degree can be conferred. Not until all the requirements of the entire process are completed will the thesis or dissertation be approved by the editor and Degree Progress (where the degree will then be verified and finally posted) notified. Deadlines are strictly enforced. No exceptions will be made. Thus, a student may not always graduate in the semester in which he or she first submits the thesis or dissertation. Upon completion of all requirements, the official USC transcript will serve as evidence of the degree until the diploma is received.

Publication
All theses and dissertations electronically submitted and approved will be forwarded to ProQuest Information and Learning and to Doheny Memorial Library for publication and availability.

Thesis/Dissertation Fees
All masterís and doctoral candidates must pay a fee as part of the final requirements for the degree. The doctoral candidateís fee, currently $110, includes ProQuest, Doheny Memorial Library and Graduate School processing fees. Masterís candidates currently pay a fee of $100 for ProQuest, Doheny Memorial Library and Graduate School processing fees. Both fees are paid at the Cashierís Office, King Hall, prior to submitting the manuscript to the Graduate School.

General Requirements for the Masterís Degree

Course Requirements
The masterís degree in the Graduate School is conferred upon the satisfactory completion of a carefully planned curriculum. A comprehensive examination may replace a thesis in certain departments. A student must enroll in GRSC 810 during the semester in which the comprehensive examination is to be taken if not otherwise enrolled. Consult the appropriate departmental section of this catalogue for specific course requirements.

For those masterís degrees not conferred by the Graduate School, the degree-conferring school determines whether or not a thesis, comprehensive exam or other summative experience is required.

See Transfer of Course Work for the maximum number of units of transferred course work that may be applied toward a masterís degree. Except in formally designated dual degree programs, this same policy regulates the number of credits that may be applied toward a masterís degree from an advanced degree previously completed at USC.

Guidance Committee
The studentís program of study and thesis and/or comprehensive examination are under the direction of a guidance committee composed of three tenure-track faculty members, at least two of whom must be from the studentís home department, who are recommended by the chair of the studentís major department, and must be approved by the dean of the degree-conferring unit. Those departments which allow a comprehensive examination in lieu of thesis and administer that comprehensive on a departmental, rather than an individual basis, may substitute a single advisor for the three-person guidance committee.

Application for the Masterís Degree
Application for the masterís degree must be made during the semester preceding the one in which the student expects to receive the degree and prior to registration in 594a Masterís Thesis. Application is made online by the academic department and then transmitted to the Degree Progress Department following approval of the program of studies by the studentís home department. Degree Progress will prepare a Credit Summary reflecting course work and requirements completed and those remaining to be met. A copy of the Credit Summary is sent to the student and the home department.

Masterís Examinations
A student who fails the masterís examination may be permitted, at the discretion of the faculty, to take it a second time. The retaking of a failed masterís examination must be completed before the end of the second consecutive semester (excluding summer session) following the first examination. Requests for exception must be approved by the department chair. A student may not take the masterís examination more than twice and must be appropriately enrolled at USC during the semester in which such an examination is taken or retaken. A student who fails the masterís examination a second time may not continue in the degree program after the end of the semester in which the second examination was taken. No exceptions are allowed.

Masterís Thesis
The thesis is supervised throughout its preparation by the studentís guidance committee. It is desirable for the student to have a conference with each committee member promptly following the approval of the topic. Thereafter, thesis work is normally under the immediate supervision of the committee chair: Final acceptance is based upon the unanimous recommendation of all members of the committee.

A student who is required to write a thesis must submit a satisfactory outline and comprehensive bibliography for the proposed thesis and demonstrate a mastery of the subject satisfactory to the guidance committee. The studentís thesis or guidance committee is responsible for the content and bibliographical consistency of the thesis.

During the five-year time limit allowed for completion of the degree and following the completion of all course work, the student must enroll in 594 Masterís Thesis for two semesters and for each semester thereafter, excluding summer, until the thesis has been approved and the approval of the masterís thesis form has been signed by the studentís guidance committee. Registration for the thesis in two semesters, excluding summer, is the minimum requirement entitling the student to thesis supervision by the guidance committee. No more than four units of credit in 594 may be received regardless of the number of semesters the student may be required to be enrolled. Students may enroll in 594 during one summer session but may not register for more than two units of 594 during a given semester; individual exceptions require the approval of the dean of the degree-conferring unit.

Students who find it necessary to be excused from registration in 594 for a semester must request a leave of absence by petition to the dean of the degree-conferring unit prior to the beginning of the semester. See Leave of Absence. Endorsements from the committee chair, department chair and the line (program) dean are required. During a leave of absence students will not be entitled to assistance from the guidance committee or to the use of university facilities. The granting of a leave of absence will take into account the studentís responsibility for meeting the time schedules for the completion of degree requirements.

Masterís Thesis Submission
Please refer to the Theses and Dissertation section for information on the submission process.

General Requirements for the Doctor of Philosophy Degree

Qualified students will be received as applicants for candidacy for the Doctor of Philosophy degree with a major in departments which are adequately equipped with staff, library and laboratory facilities to furnish the necessary training and opportunities for original research.

Screening Procedures
A screening examination or other procedure designated by the department or program is to be administered before the student has taken more than 24 units (including research courses). Passing this procedure is prerequisite to continuation in the doctoral program. Students who fail the screening procedure will be advised that they are not recommended to continue in the Ph.D. program and that any additional work may not be counted toward the degree. Failure to undertake the screening procedure before completion of 24 units of course work may jeopardize additional units. A faculty member will be appointed to serve as the studentís advisor until an approved guidance committee is established.

Course Requirements
The subject or field of concentration is called a major. The major is usually a departmental major, although several interdepartmental majors have been authorized.

Undergraduate prerequisite and graduate course work will be required in accordance with the regulations of the major department or program and the recommendation of the studentís guidance committee. Consult the appropriate departmental section of this catalogue for specific course requirements.

Guidance Committee
The studentís program of studies is under the direction of a guidance committee. Admission to graduate standing is prerequisite to establishing a guidance committee. The guidance committee should be established within the department at least two semesters prior to taking the qualifying examination. An appointment of committee form, which can be obtained from the Graduate School Web site, should be used to establish the guidance committee. Students initiate the paperwork and submit the signed form to the department chair or the program directorís office.

The guidance committee is composed of at least five members; a minimum of three, including at least one tenured member, must be from the studentís home department and one must be a faculty member from outside the studentís home department. In the case of schools which are organized into several departments (e.g., business, education, music), but for which a single Ph.D. program is authorized, the outside member must be from outside the school. The Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Programs is ex officio a member of all guidance committees.

Normally, all members of the guidance-dissertation committee must be regular officers of instruction of the rank of assistant professor or above in departments offering the Ph.D. degree at USC. In exceptional cases, faculty in departments or schools not offering the Ph.D. degree; research, adjunct and emeritus faculty; and faculty from other universities may be acceptable as members of guidance committees. Such exceptions must be approved on an individual basis by the dean of the degree-conferring unit. Approval will be based on the special expertise and academic relevance afforded the individual studentís research. A current curriculum vitae of the proposed member must be submitted to the dean of the degree-conferring unit with a letter from the studentís committee chair citing the particular academic merits of the requested appointment. Such a member must meet the standards of academic training and research experience expected of faculty members serving on such committees. A specially approved member may serve as co-chair of the committee but usually may not serve as the outside member representing the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Programs.

The outside member is defined as a person from a discipline different from that of the studentís department and whose own department affiliation is different from that of the student. A faculty member who holds a joint appointment in the studentís department may only serve as an outside member when the primary appointment is in an outside department or school. The outside member serves as the representative of the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Programs. As such, the outside member determines if the qualifying examination and dissertation processes are conducted at a level that warrants awarding the Ph.D. degree. The outside member also ensures that the student is justly and fairly treated by a committee and department. Finally, it is hoped that the outside member will contribute to the studentís preparation as a scholar.

When the student and the guidance committee have determined that the qualifying examination can be taken, the Request to Take the Qualifying Examination form, which can be obtained from the Graduate School Web site, is the means by which the student is given permission to take the formal qualifying examination. The signed form should be filed with the department chair or the program directorís office not later than 30 days before the beginning date of the examination.

The guidance committee has the responsibility for supervising the studentís program of studies and preparation for the qualifying examination, and the administration and evaluation of the written and oral parts of the qualifying examination. The committee continues to serve until the qualifying examination has been passed, the dissertation topic approved, and the student is admitted to candidacy.

Changes in Guidance Committees
A Change of Committee form, which can be obtained from the Graduate School Web site, must be completed whenever a change is made in the guidance committee. All such changes must be made in advance of the qualifying examinations. Informal substitutions for either the written or oral parts of the qualifying examination are not permitted. Changes in the guidance committee are not permitted between the written and oral portions of the examination. The examinations must be scheduled at times when it is possible for all members of the committee, including the outside member, to participate. Changes made without the prior approval of the dean of the degree-conferring unit are not recognized and may result in the invalidation of the examination.

A student may not change committee members after failing the qualifying examination the first time. The student must be reexamined by the same faculty on the same subject matter. If a faculty member is unable to serve on the committee (for example, due to serious illness, retirement, or transfer to another institution), the dean of the degree-conferring unit must be notified in writing in advance of the rescheduled exam in order to approve the change. The faculty replacement must be approved by the dean of the degree-conferring unit and the student must file a change of committee form well in advance of the exam.

Qualifying Examination
The examination qualifying a student for candidacy for the Ph.D. degree is comprehensive in nature, partly written and partly oral, designed, at least in part, to test the studentís fitness to undertake independent research. Prior to taking the qualifying examination, the student must have met all of the departmental requirements for doing so and have the recommendation of the guidance committee. The qualifying examination is normally taken not later than during the fifth semester of graduate standing. The student should note the maximum time limit for completing the degree.

To be eligible to take the qualifying examination, the student must have completed at least 24 units applicable toward the degree in residence at USC and must have achieved a GPA of at least 3.0 on all USC course work available for graduate credit, and the guidance committee has determined that the student is ready to take the qualifying examination. A student must enroll in GRSC 800 during the semester in which the qualifying examination is to be taken if not otherwise enrolled. Students are strongly encouraged to take the qualifying examination during the first semester in which they are enrolled in GRSC 800 and, at a minimum, to enroll in no more than three semesters of GRSC 800 before taking the qualifying examination.

All portions of the examination must be completed within 60 days. Postponement of the examination after permission has been granted must have approval of the dean of the degree-conferring unit.

The written examination will be prepared, administered on campus and read by the guidance committee; in a few departments there will be a department-wide committee examining all doctoral students. When the studentís written examination is satisfactory, an oral examination is given covering, in depth, topics discussed in the written examination or touching upon additional material. A student must pass both the written and oral portions of the qualifying examination in order to pass the examination. The fact that a student has done well on the written examination is not to be construed to mean that the oral examination is to be a pro forma exercise.

The oral examination is a serious and integral part of the qualifying procedure. If on the written examination the judgment of the committee is such that an oral examination cannot counterbalance a poor performance, the committee is not obliged to give an oral examination and the report to the Graduate School will be one of failure. In the case where the written examination is marginal, the committee may use the oral examination as an opportunity to confirm or alter its judgment of the studentís performance.

The examination may not be reported as being passed if there is more than one dissenting vote. Ph.D. examinations cannot be passed conditionally. A pass on the examination cannot be made contingent upon other factors such as the completion of additional course work, the preparation of extra research projects, etc.

During the oral examination, all members of the guidance committee must be present and must render a judgment on the studentís qualifying examination. Only the guidance committee may participate in the oral portion of the examination.

A student who fails a qualifying examination may be permitted, at the discretion of the faculty, to take it a second time. The student may not be required to repeat parts of the qualifying examination which were passed on the first administration. The retaking of a failed qualifying examination must be scheduled at a time mutually satisfactory and not less than six months from the date of the first examination.

The second examination must be completed before the end of the second consecutive semester (excluding summer session) following the first examination. Requests for an exception must be approved by the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Programs. A student may not take the qualifying examination more than twice and must be appropriately enrolled at USC during the semester in which such an examination is taken or retaken. A student who fails the qualifying examination a second time may not continue in the degree program after the end of the semester in which the second examination was taken. No exceptions are allowed.

Admission to Candidacy
Graduate students are officially admitted to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree when they have completed the residency requirement and passed the written and oral portions of the Ph.D. qualifying examination upon the favorable recommendation of the guidance committee to the Graduate School. All Ph.D. candidates are required to engage in original research.

Application for the Ph.D.
After being admitted to candidacy, students must contact their academic department to initiate an online degree check which is transmitted to the Degree Progress Department. Degree Progress counselors prepare a degree summary report for each student listing any remaining requirements. The requirements will not be checked or the degree conferred if the student has not applied.

Dissertation Committee
After the qualifying examination has been passed and a dissertation topic approved, the guidance committee shall be known as the dissertation committee, and may be reduced to three members, upon the committeeís unanimous recommendation to the dean of the degree-conferring unit. Two committee members must be from the home department, at least one of whom must be tenured, and one of the three members must be a faculty member from outside the major department. An Appointment of Committee form, which can be obtained from the Graduate School Web site, should be used to establish the dissertation committee. Students initiate the paperwork and submit the signed form to the department chair or the program directorís office. The dissertation committee should be appointed as soon as possible after the student has passed the qualification exam. Until a dissertation committee has been appointed, the guidance committee will take responsibility for the studentís program of study. Refer to the Guidance Committee section for additional membership requirements. The Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Programs is ex officio a member of all dissertation committees.

Special permission for a member of the research faculty to serve as chair of a Ph.D. studentís dissertation committee may be granted by the dean of the degree-conferring unit or his or her nominee, on an individual case basis upon the written request of the department chair establishing that (1) the person has a research appointment in the studentís home department; (2) no tenure-track faculty in the department has the necessary knowledge or expertise required; and (3) the researcher has demonstrated special expertise in the particular area of the proposed dissertation. The dissertation and its defense, or final oral, must have the unanimous approval of the dissertation committee.

Doctoral Dissertation
A dissertation is an original contribution to current knowledge in the field and a demonstration that the Ph.D. candidate has achieved sufficient mastery in the field to pursue independent research and scholarship. A dissertation represents the individual candidateís research and writing. In fields where collaborative research has become the norm, the candidate is the sole author of the dissertation and specifies his or her contribution to the research and also delineates colleaguesí contributions.

Dissertations are expected to be written in English. Exceptions require the approval of the Associate Vice Provost for Graduate Programs or his or her nominee prior to beginning the work and will be granted only when there is strong scholarly justification.

The student is expected to be enrolled in 794 Doctoral Dissertation each semester, except summer sessions, after admission to candidacy until all degree requirements are completed. Registration for the dissertation in the two semesters, excluding summer sessions, following admission to candidacy, is the minimum requirement entitling the candidate to dissertation supervision by the dissertation committee. Enrollment in 794 prior to admission to candidacy is not permitted and such registration is invalid. If the dissertation is not completed and accepted within two semesters the candidate must continue to register for 794 each semester thereafter until the dissertation has been approved and the approval of the Ph.D. dissertation has been signed by the dissertation committee. Students may enroll in 794 during one summer session but may not register for more than two units of 794 during a given semester; individual exceptions require the approval of the dean of the degree-conferring unit. No more than eight units of credit in 794 may be received regardless of the number of semesters the candidate may be required to be enrolled. Department approval is required for registration in 794.

A candidate who finds it necessary to be excused from registration in 794 for a semester must request a leave of absence by petition to the dean of the degree-conferring unit prior to the beginning of the semester. See Leave of Absence. Endorsements from the committee chair, and department chair are required. During a leave of absence the candidate will not be entitled to assistance from the dissertation committee or to the use of university facilities. The granting of a leave of absence will take into account the candidateís responsibility for meeting the time schedules for the completion of degree requirements.

Defense of the Dissertation
After passing all required course examinations and the qualifying examination, and after meeting all other requirements, the candidate must defend the dissertation. This defense will be conducted in such a manner as to determine to the unanimous satisfaction of the dissertation committee that the candidate has attained the stage of scholarly advancement and power of investigation demanded by the university for final recommendation to the doctorate.

While the oral examination is open to the general university community, only the members of the dissertation committee shall have the authority to recommend acceptance of the dissertation. During the oral defense, all members of the dissertation committee must be present and must render a judgment on the studentís defense. The recommendation must be unanimous.

If the defense is satisfactory, the committee then signs the approval of the Ph.D. dissertation form. If additional work is required, the form is signed at a later date. Departments differ concerning the time of the defense of the dissertation. The studentís dissertation committee is responsible for the content and bibliographical consistency of the dissertation.

Dissertation Submission
Please refer to the Theses and Dissertation section for more information on the submission process.