Column Spacer   Column Spacer
 
MONDAY, JANUARY 25, 2016   If you are unable to view this email, click here
Email Header
     
Top Left
 

Dear Friends:

Tonight, don’t miss a fascinating conversation with YA author John Corey Whaley about mortality, adolescence, and medical ethics. Also this week, you can see the Oscar-winning film Still Alice, encounter groundbreaking performance artists at Live Artists Live, and head to the Music Center for the beauty of Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan. Plus, we are thrilled to announce that we have just added an event featuring the extraordinary feminist activist Gloria Steinem. And, if you haven’t already, be sure to RSVP for a very special signature event featuring Lisa Genova, the acclaimed author of the best-selling book Still Alice. Read on for details on these and other exciting events!

–The Visions and Voices Team

Index Spacer
Left Index

 

LOOKING AHEAD

3/1: Water Rites, more info

3/2: wild Up and Edge, more info

3/3: The Oresteia Project, more info

Index Spacer
Left Index

 

 Event Calendar

 Twitter Button

 Facebook Button

 Instagram Button

 USC Libraries Explorations Button

 Contact button
 
Top Content

Email Header


 

A conversation with John Corey Whaley

 

 

What We Can Learn from a Severed Head
A Conversation with John Corey Whaley
Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics Series

Monday, January 25, 5:30 p.m.

 Aresty Auditorium, Harlyne J. Norris Research Tower
Book signing and reception to follow.
Admission is free and open to everyone. Rush tickets will be available at the event check-in. Check-in opens at 5 p.m.

Award-winning YA author John Corey Whaley (Where Things Come Back) comes to USC for a fascinating conversation about mortality; adolescence; and the medical, ethical, and scientific aspects of a severed head. In Whaley’s novel Noggin, a sixteen-year-old, diagnosed with terminal cancer, decides to participate in an experimental procedure: his head is removed and cryogenically frozen in order to be reattached to a donor’s body. A finalist for the National Book Award and a highly unconventional “cancer book,” Noggin is “a tour de force of imagination and empathy” (Booklist). Whaley will discuss the book and its implications with Lynn Kysh of the USC Norris Medical Library.
Organized by Pamela Schaff (Pediatrics and Family Medicine), Lyn Boyd-Judson (Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics), Alexander Capron (Law and Medicine), Lynn Kysh (USC Libraries), and Berislav Zlokovic (Physiology and Biophysics). Co-sponsored by the Keck School of Medicine’s Program in Medical Humanities, Arts, and Ethics, the USC Pacific Center for Health Policy and Ethics, and the USC Levan Institute for Humanities and Ethics.
For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Still Alice

 

 

Still Alice—Movie Screening
Tuesday, January 26, 7 p.m.
The Albert and Dana Broccoli Theatre, School of Cinematic Arts 112
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required. While advance reservations are full, tickets may be available at the event check-in on a standby basis.
“...warm, compassionate, bitingly honest...”—Hollywood Reporter
In conjunction with the Visions and Voices signature event Something’s Not Right with Alice: Understanding Alzheimer’s: A Conversation with Lisa Genova and Arthur Toga, we will present a special screening of the critically acclaimed film Still Alice. Alice Howland, happily married with three grown children, is a renowned linguistics professor who starts to forget words. When she receives a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, Alice and her family find their bonds thoroughly tested. Her struggle to stay connected to who she once was is frightening, heartbreaking, and inspiring. Starring Julianne Moore in an Oscar-winning performance, Still Alice is based on Lisa Genova’s novel of the same name.
Organized by the USC School of Cinematic Arts.
For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Live Artists Live

 

 

Live Artists Live
Performance and the Witness: Ron Athey

Thursday, January 28, 8 p.m.
Human Resources
410 Cottage Home St., Los Angeles, 90012
Admission is free and open to everyone. While advance reservations are full, tickets will be available at the event check-in on a standby basis. Check-in opens at 6:30 p.m. at Human Resources. Transportation from the University Park Campus will be available for USC students, staff, and faculty. For those using USC transportation, check-in opens at 5:30 p.m. at Gate 2.

Join us for the opening event of Live Artists Live, a two-day series of performances and discussions about performance art. Live Artists Live will open with a performance of new work by cutting-edge artist Ron Athey. From his underground art of the 1980s through international tours in the ’90s to his ceaselessly provocative works of today, Athey is renowned for projects such as Judas Cradle, the Perpetual Wound/Incorruptible Flesh series, and Self-Obliteration. He will present his newest work, introduced by scholars Amelia Jones and Jennifer Doyle.
Organized by Amelia Jones and the USC Roski School of Art and Design.
Please note that Athey employs extreme body art in his performance work that may be unsuitable for some viewers.
For more info and to sign up for the waitlist, click here.

 

 
 

Live Artists Live

 

 

Live Artists Live
Performances and Dialogues

Friday, January 29, 9:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.
USC Graduate Fine Arts Building (IFT)
3001 S. Flower St., Los Angeles, 90007
Admission is free and open to everyone. While advance reservations are full for USC alumni and the general public, a limited number of tickets are available for USC students, staff, and faculty. RSVP online now! Rush tickets will also be available at the door; space may be limited for some performances and dialogues. Check-in will open at 9 a.m. and continue throughout the day.
Live art is a term used for performance art in the visual-arts realm. In a series of dynamic performances and dialogues, world-renowned artists and scholars including Ron Athey, Ulay, Harry Gamboa Jr., Nao Bustamante, Lynn Hershman Leeson, Cassils, Jack Halberstam, and Rebecca Schneider will explore key questions about the medium: How do live art performances get archived, documented, or otherwise written into history and remembered? How do audiences experience live art? How is live art created? Luminaries and legends of performance art will engage with these questions and more in a full day of conversations and live performances.
Organized by Amelia Jones and the USC Roski School of Art and Design.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Live Artists Live

 

 

Live Artists Live
Performing Histories with the Body: Narcissister

Friday, January 29, 7 p.m.
ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives
909 West Adams Blvd., Los Angeles, 90007
Reception to follow.
Admission is free and open to everyone. While advance reservations are full for USC alumni and the general public, a limited number of tickets are available for USC students, staff, and faculty. RSVP online now! Tickets will also be available at the event check-in on a standby basis. Check-in opens at 6:30 p.m.
Live Artists Live closes with a performance by the dynamic Brooklyn-based artist Narcissister. Wearing mask and merkin, she works at the intersection of performance, dance, art, and activism, integrating her experience as a professional dancer and commercial artist with photography, video art, and experimental music. Her film The Self-Gratifier won an award for “Best Use of a Sex Toy” at the 2008 Good Vibrations Erotic Film Festival, and she has intrigued and entertained audiences all over the world. Interested in troubling the divide between popular entertainment and experimental art, Narcissister appeared on America’s Got Talent in 2011. She will close out Live Artists Live with a provocative performance, followed by a reception.
Organized by Amelia Jones and the USC Roski School of Art and Design.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre

 

 

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan
An Experience L.A. Event

Saturday, January 30
Depart USC at 6:30 p.m.; return at 10:30 p.m.
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles
Admission is free and open to USC students only. Reservations required. While advance reservations are full, tickets will be available at the event check-in on a standby basis. Check-in opens at 5:45 p.m. at Gate 2.

“[A] sharply moving synthesis of man and nature, east and west, death and rebirth...”—The Guardian
Glorya Kaufman Presents Dance at the Music Center brings Cloud Gate Dance Theatre of Taiwan to Los Angeles. Immersed in everything from meditation to martial arts to modern dance, Asia’s most renowned contemporary dance company makes its Music Center debut in a stunning production of Rice. Brimming with beauty, strength, and breathtaking choreography set against powerful videographic imagery, Rice is a “song of the earth” (The Guardian) by choreographer Lin Hwai-min, the ever-innovative founder of the company and a recipient of the Samuel H. Scripps/American Dance Festival Award for Lifetime Achievement for his extraordinary contribution to modern dance.
Open to USC students only. Students must use the provided transportation. For more info and to sign up for the waitlist, click here.

 

 
 

Gloria Steinem

 

 

Gloria Steinem: Activism and Equality
Wednesday, February 3, 6 to 7:45 p.m.
Bovard Auditorium
Admission is free and open to USC students, staff, faculty, and alumni only.

Join us for an evening with groundbreaking feminist Gloria Steinem, whose multifaceted career combines activism, journalism, politics, business, and media. As an activist and entrepreneur, Steinem co-founded Ms. magazine, the Women’s Action Alliance, the National Women’s Political Caucus, and the Women’s Media Center. As an author, Steinem has written several best-selling books, including My Life on the Road, which was named one of O: The Oprah Magazine’s Ten Favorite Books of the Year. With 60 years of public service, Steinem has received numerous awards and honors, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Steinem will discuss her extraordinary life and work in a provocative conversation moderated by David Belasco, executive director of the Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies at the USC Marshall School of Business.
Presented by the Lloyd Greif Center for Entrepreneurial Studies, the USC Marshall School of Business, the USC Speakers Committee, and USC Visions and Voices: The Arts and Humanities Initiative.
Open to USC students, staff, faculty, and alumni only. For more info and to RSVP, click here. (Event code: STEINEM)

 

 
 

Lisa Genova and Arthur Toga

 

 

Something’s Not Right with Alice: Understanding Alzheimer’s
A Conversation with Lisa Genova and Arthur Toga
Moderated by Ina Jaffe
A Visions and Voices Signature Event

Thursday, February 4, 7 p.m.
Bovard Auditorium
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.
Lisa Genova is a neuroscientist and award-winning author of several best-selling novels, including Still Alice. The book was adapted into a powerful film starring Julianne Moore, who won an Academy Award for her role as a professor diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. Genova has traveled internationally to speak about Alzheimer’s disease, traumatic brain injury, and autism, and has appeared on Dr. Oz, The Diane Rehm Show, CNN, and many other major media outlets. NPR correspondent Ina Jaffe will moderate a fascinating conversation with Genova and USC professor and brain researcher Arthur Toga about the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on individuals, families, and communities.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Frau Schindler

 

 

Frau Schindler—A Concert Reading
Friday, February 5
7 p.m.: Pre-Performance Discussion
8 p.m.: Performance
Alfred Newman Recital Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

As an ordinary couple who became immersed in extraordinary circumstances, Oskar and Emilie Schindler found themselves faced with the ultimate moral decision. Told from Emilie Schindler’s perspective and reflecting new scholarly insights into the Schindlers’ lives, Frau Schindler is a poignant opera that examines how two living, breathing human beings who essentially endure the same daily wartime experiences can see them from two very different points of view. It is the story of a woman’s survival and heroism in the heart of one of the darkest periods in human history. Frau Schindler is composed by USC film scoring alumnus Thomas Morse, with a libretto and direction by Ken Cazan, chair of Vocal Arts and Opera at the USC Thornton School of Music, in collaboration with Morse.
Organized by the USC Thornton School of Music.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Lisa Genova and Arthur Toga

 

 

Fly
By Trey Ellis and Ricardo Khan
An Experience L.A. Event

Saturday, February 6
Depart USC at 6:30 p.m.; return at 11:30 p.m.
The Pasadena Playhouse, Pasadena
Admission is free and open to USC students only. Reservations required.

“[A] superior piece of theatrical synergy”—The New York Times
Fly tells the story of the first African American Army Air Corps fighters, known as the Tuskegee Airmen, who flew over Europe and North Africa during World War II. Co-author and director Ricardo Khan is the Tony Award–winning co-founder and former artistic director of the Crossroads Theatre Company, one of the nation’s foremost African American theatre companies. Featuring a cast of eight men, including dancer Tap Griot, Fly dramatizes the historic contributions made by the Tuskegee Airmen to the struggle for civil rights and the desegregation of the American military.
Open to USC students only. Students must use the provided transportation. RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 

Email Header


 

Naomi Klein

 

 

Naomi Klein: This Changes Everything
Tuesday, February 9, 7 p.m.
Town and Gown
Reception and book signing to follow.
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required. While advance reservations are full for USC alumni and the general public, a limited number of tickets are available for USC students, staff, and faculty.

This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs. the Climate is a book of such ambition and consequence that it is almost unreviewable. [It is] the most momentous and contentious environmental book since Silent Spring.”—The New York Times Book Review
Join us for a very special evening with Canadian author, activist, and filmmaker Naomi Klein, a leading critic of corporate globalization and capitalism. Klein has elucidated the often mystifyingly abstract realm of neoliberal economics in best-selling books No Logo and The Shock Doctrine. Her most recent book and film, This Changes Everything: Capitalism vs the Climate, debuted at number 5 on the New York Times Best Sellers list and was a New York Times Notable Book of 2014. Klein’s work illuminates the importance of addressing economics in any effort to preserve our planet. In a deeply thoughtful and provocative lecture, she will ask us to reflect on the connections between the market and the planet—and what roles we can play in creating a just, sustainable future.
Organized by Kelly Shannon and the USC School of Architecture. Co-sponsored by the USC Environmental Student Assembly.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

True Crime: Detective Fiction and the Film Noir Myth of Los Angeles

 

 

True Crime: Detective Fiction and the Film Noir Myth of Los Angeles
Thursday, February 18, 4 p.m.
Friends of the USC Libraries Lecture Hall, Doheny Memorial Library 240
Reception to follow.
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

In film noir and mystery fiction, detectives inhabit a troubled moral universe that refuses easy distinctions between police, criminals, and everyone else. In fiction and real life, detectives enter the minds of criminals while retracing their motives and emotional states. They also make use of surveillance, wiretapping, and criminal informants—practices that pose moral quandaries about the boundaries between justice and legality. Join us for a conversation about the crafts of crime writing and crime solving, as well as the noir myth of Los Angeles, with crime novelist Walter Mosley; Andrew Marlowe, creator of the acclaimed TV series Castle; USC Gould School of Law professor Heidi Rummel; and retired LAPD detective Glynn Martin. Screenwriter and USC School of Cinematic Arts professor Howard Rodman will moderate. In conjunction, the USC Libraries will present an exhibition in Doheny Memorial Library tracing the history of detectives in the popular imagination and offer an interactive, mixed-reality detective game.
Organized by the USC Libraries.
RSVP online beginning Wednesday, January 27, at 9 a.m. For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Robert Towne Retrospective

 

 

Robert Towne Retrospective
Friday, February 19 to Sunday, February 21
The Ray Stark Family Theatre, School of Cinematic Arts 108
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Join us for a three-day retrospective of the work of Academy Award–winning screenwriter Robert Towne. A key figure of the “New Hollywood” wave of filmmaking, Towne wrote the Oscar-winning screenplay for what may be the most iconic Los Angeles film of all time: Chinatown (1974). During the same era, he wrote The Last Detail, Shampoo, and Greystroke: The Legend of Tarzan, all of which earned him Oscar nominations. He also doubled as writer and director on films including Personal Best and Tequila Sunrise. Over a career spanning Los Angeles films, action films, TV, and much more, Towne’s numerous other credits include Mission: Impossible I and II, Days of Thunder, The Firm, and Mad Men. Screenings of Chinatown, The Last Detail, Shampoo, Days of Thunder, The Firm, Mission: Impossible, and others will be complemented by in-person conversations with Towne and his friends and collaborators.
Produced by Alessandro Ago and Ted Braun for the USC School of Cinematic Arts.
For more info, click here.

 

 
 

LA Opera: The Magic Flute

 

 

LA Opera: The Magic Flute
An Experience L.A. Event

Wednesday, February 24
Depart USC at 6 p.m.; return at 11 p.m.
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion, Los Angeles
Admission is free and open to USC students only. Reservations required.

A celebration of true love conquering all, Mozart’s The Magic Flute is one of the most beloved works in all of opera. The story transports us into an enchanted world where good faces evil. Under the masterful baton of James Conlon, LA Opera presents a highly anticipated revival of a production that created a sensation in their 2013–14 season. Director Barrie Kosky created the staging in collaboration with the British theatre group 1927, whose humorous shows have thrilled audiences all over the world with their interaction between film animation and live actors. Packed with exquisite singing and stage wizardry, The Magic Flute promises a delightful blend of high comedy and serious drama.
Open to USC students only. Students must use the provided transportation. RSVP online beginning Thursday, January 28, at 9 a.m. For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Even Me

 

 

Even Me
Thursday, February 25, 7 p.m.
The Ray Stark Family Theatre, School of Cinematic Arts 108
Reception to follow.
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Even Me is an award-winning documentary that highlights the rise of HIV/AIDS among older adults in communities of color. HIV-positive people of color in Los Angeles share their brutally honest stories of living and aging with the disease. Even Me dispels the myths that HIV/AIDS is a gay or young person’s disease, highlighting the fact that age is no vaccine and exploring the truth of how HIV/AIDS is affecting elders of color in our communities. Even Me was made by Megan Ebor, who worked in the field of aging as a senior advocate, care manager, and long-term-care ombudsman for nearly 15 years. After a screening of Even Me, USC professor Karen D. Lincoln will moderate a panel discussion with filmmaker Megan Ebor, cast members, and activist/community organizer Carrie Broadus.
Organized by Karen D. Lincoln (Social Work).
Co-sponsored by the USC Edward R. Roybal Institute on Aging, USC Hartford Center of Excellence in Geriatric Social Work, Advocates for African American Elders, and USC School of Cinematic Arts.
RSVP online beginning Monday, February 1, at 9 a.m. For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Microlibraries

 

 

Microlibraries in the Everywhere
Part I: Create a Tiny Library

Friday, February 26, 4 p.m.
Friends of the USC Libraries Lecture Hall, Doheny Memorial Library Room 240
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Join us on an innovative walking tour to help create future microlibraries on the USC campus. What are the moral and ethical dimensions of free access to knowledge? How can the design of a space shape the experience of interacting with information? Microlibraries in the Everywhere will explore these questions with an exhibition of ten unique microlibraries created collaboratively by USC professor Lee Olvera, students in the USC Master of Management in Library and Information Science Program, the USC Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study—and perhaps you. USC students will participate in shaping the future microlibraries by helping to craft their appearance, thematic focus, and contents. Professor Lee Olvera of the USC School of Architecture and Los Angeles–based curators or creators of microlibraries will guide the walking tour of future microlibrary sites.
Organized by the USC Libraries, USC School of Architecture, and USC Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study.
RSVP online beginning Tuesday, February 2, at 9 a.m. For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Los Angeles Philharmonic: Dudamel and Music from the Americas

 

 

Los Angeles Philharmonic: Dudamel and Music from the Americas
An Experience L.A. Event

Saturday, February 27
Depart USC at 6:30 p.m.; return at 10:30 p.m.
Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles
Admission is free and open to USC students only. Reservations required.

Venezuelan-born Gustavo Dudamel, music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the Orquesta Sinfónica Simón Bolívar, will conduct the LA Phil in a vibrant program of music from North and South America. The evening will include John Williams’s Soundings, which the composer created to capture the “colorful sonorities” of Walt Disney Concert Hall; Alberto Ginastera’s furious and fantastic Piano Concerto no. 1; a world premiere of a new work by Los Angeles–based composer Andrew Norman, who aims to create “propulsive energy” in his compositions; and Appalachian Spring, a lively and beloved work by the great American composer Aaron Copland.
Open to USC students only. Students must use the provided transportation. Tickets will be distributed on a lottery basis. Sign up for the lottery online on Wednesday, February 3, between 7 a.m. and 2 p.m. For more info and to sign up for the lottery, click here.

 

 
 

The Orion String Quartet

 

 

The Orion String Quartet Performs Haydn’s Seven Last Words
Sunday, February 28, 4 p.m.
Alfred Newman Recital Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Join us for a special afternoon performance of Haydn’s Seven Last Words of Christ by the Orion String Quartet, followed by a discussion with scholars of poetry, music, and religion. Seven Last Words of Christ was first performed in 1787. Commissioned to produce an oratorio during Lent, Joseph Haydn created seven meditations on Christ’s last words, drawn from all four gospels. We invite you to encounter this moving, spiritual composition via a live performance by the Orion String Quartet, known for bringing a fresh perspective to classical works. Varun Soni will moderate a discussion about the meaning and complexity of Seven Last Words with scholars Dana Gioia, Tim Page, and David Albertson. The confluence of words, music, and religious and secular discussion will inspire you to contemplate human existence and the transcendent force of art across cultures and belief systems.
Organized by Karen Dreyfus (Music).
RSVP online beginning Wednesday, February 3, at 9 a.m. For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Backstage with the Creators of Serial

 

 

Binge-Worthy Journalism: Backstage with the Creators of Serial, Sarah Koenig and Julie Snyder
A Visions and Voices Signature Event

Friday, March 4, 7 p.m.
Bovard Auditorium
ADMISSION:
FREE for USC Students, Staff, and Faculty with Valid ID (one free ticket per ID)
$15, USC Alumni
$20, General Public

Launched in 2014, Serial became the fastest podcast to reach five million downloads in iTunes history. The first season of the podcast presented a 12-part series on one legal case, captivating an audience that downloaded the episodes more than 100 million times (and counting). In their live presentation, co-creators Sarah Koenig and Julie Snyder take the audience backstage in this cultural phenomenon, using some of their favorite tape to narrate personal stories about the ups and downs of creating a new form of modern storytelling.
RSVP or buy tickets online beginning Thursday, February 4, at 9 a.m. For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
  For more information on these and other events, please visit our website at visionsandvoices.usc.edu.

You have received this email because you are signed up for the Visions and Voices email list. If you would like to be removed from this list, please click here.
 
Bottom Content