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MONDAY, OCTOBER 5, 2015   If you are unable to view this email, click here
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Dear Friends:

This weekend, don’t miss Singing in the Lion’s Mouth, a powerful exploration of the role of music in resisting mass genocide, including a live concert and screenings of documentaries about System of a Down and Beethoven’s Ninth. Also this week, USC students will have a chance to hear the LA Phil at Disney Hall and see The Sound of Music at the Ahmanson. Read on for details about these and other exciting events!

–The Visions and Voices Team

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LOOKING AHEAD

11/1: The Musical and Comedic Sinatra, more info

11/5: Sinatra on Film, more info

11/12: History of the Cello, more info


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 Event Calendar

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Dudamel

 

 

Los Angeles Philharmonic: Dudamel Conducts Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9
An Experience L.A. Event

Tuesday, October 6
Depart USC at 6:30 p.m.; return at 10:30 p.m.
Walt Disney Concert Hall, Los Angeles
Admission is free and open to USC students only. While advance reservations are full, tickets will be available at the event check-in on a standby basis. Check-in opens at 5:45 p.m. at Gate 2.
“[T]he central work of Western classical music”—The Guardian
Los Angeles Philharmonic artistic director and conductor Gustavo Dudamel, with the LA Phil, the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, and the Los Angeles Master Chorale, will present Beethoven’s Symphony no. 9, almost universally considered to be the greatest work by one of the greatest composers of all time. The monumental Choral Symphony features the first use of voices in a symphony, including the famous “Ode to Joy.” The LA Phil will perform with the Simón Bolívar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, which is composed of more than 200 young musicians between the ages of 18 and 28.
Open to USC students only. Students must use the provided transportation. For more info and to sign up for the waitlist, click here.

 

 
 

The Sound of Music

 

 

The Sound of Music
An Experience L.A. Event

Wednesday, October 7
Depart USC at 6:30 p.m.; return at 11:30 p.m.
Ahmanson Theatre, Los Angeles
Admission is free and open to USC students only. While advance reservations are full, tickets will be available at the event check-in on a standby basis. Check-in opens at 5:45 p.m. at Gate 2.

Three-time Tony Award winner Jack O’Brien brings a lavish new production of The Sound of Music to Los Angeles’s Ahmanson Theatre. The vibrant, romantic story of Maria and the von Trapp family features songs that have been beloved by audiences since the musical’s 1959 premiere: “Do-Re-Mi,” “My Favorite Things,” “Edelweiss,” and of course “The Sound of Music.” Don’t imagine that you know The Sound of Music if you have only seen the movie. As Ted Chapin of the Rodgers and Hammerstein Organization notes, “The stage show and the movie version are each their own entity, and are [both] brilliant.”
Open to USC students only. Students must use the provided transportation. For more info and to sign up for the waitlist, click here.

 

 
 

Singing in the Lion's Mouth

 

 

Singing in the Lion’s Mouth: Music as Resistance to Genocide
- Screenings of Screamers and Following the Ninth: Saturday, October 10, 4 to 9:30 p.m., School of Cinematic Arts 108
- Symposium: Sunday, October 11, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., The Forum Room, Ronald Tutor Campus Center
- Concert: Sunday, October 11, 7:30 p.m., Reception to Follow, Alfred Newman Recital Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. RSVP online now! Rush tickets will also be available at the event check-in. Check-in opens 45 minutes before the start of each event.
Can music resound against violent oppression? To commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Armenian Genocide, a weekend of events will explore the role of music in resisting mass violence and raising consciousness. On Saturday, we will screen two documentaries: Screamers (2006) observes how the rock band System of a Down raised awareness of the Armenian Genocide, and Following the Ninth: In the Footsteps of Beethoven’s Final Symphony (2013) examines how people around the world have used “Ode to Joy” to resist dictatorships. Sunday, an international symposium will explore music as a tool of resistance during the Holocaust, the Armenian and Indonesian genocides, Apartheid-era South Africa, and elsewhere. Sunday night, join us for a powerful concert featuring students from the USC Thornton School of Music.
Organized by Wolf Gruner (Jewish Studies and History), Nick Strimple (Music), and USC Shoah Foundation Center for Advanced Genocide Research in collaboration with the USC Thornton School of Music.
For more info and to RSVP for the screenings, click here; to RSVP for the symposium, click here; and to RSVP for the concert, click here.

 

 
 

Earth's Waters

 

 

Earth’s Waters: Rivers, Lakes, and Oceans in Poetry and Music
Monday, October 12, 7 p.m.
USC Fisher Museum of Art
Admission is free and open to everyone. While advance reservations are full, we are currently accepting waitlist reservations.

From William Shakespeare’s “Full Fathom Five” to W.B. Yeats’s “The Lake Isle of Innisfree,” poetry has attempted to reflect on and reckon with water. Music, too, has aimed to grasp this elusive element—essential to all life, sometimes softly flowing and sometimes terrifying with its chaotic power. A live performance of famous poetic texts set to music will celebrate the earth’s rivers, lakes, and oceans. Pianist Victoria Kirsch, poet and USC Professor of Poetry and Public Culture Dana Gioia, soprano Jamie Chamberlin, baritone David Castillo, violinists Shalini Vijayan and Hana Kim, violist Luke Maurer, and cellist Charles Tyler will perform along with student readers.
Organized by the USC Fisher Museum of Art.
For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Gaming the Future of Los Angeles

 

 

Gaming the Future of Los Angeles
Thursday, October 15, 4 p.m.
Friends of the USC Libraries Lecture Hall, Doheny Memorial Library 240
Reception to follow.
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Join USC Libraries Discovery Fellow Geoff Manaugh for a public introduction to L.A.T.B.D., which explores diverse possible futures for the city of Los Angeles. Incorporating speculative fiction, game design, and architectural modeling, L.A.T.B.D. will allow exhibition visitors to generate their own unique visions of a Los Angeles yet to be determined. Manaugh developed L.A.T.B.D. with architects Mark Smout and Laura Allen as well as Professor Jeff Watson and his students at the USC School of Cinematic Arts. Manaugh, who writes the widely acclaimed architecture blog BLDGBLOG, was a former editor at Dwell, editor in chief at Gizmodo, and contributing editor at Wired UK.
Organized by USC Libraries and the USC Sidney Harman Academy for Polymathic Study with additional funding from the British Council and University College London.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

The Metropolitan Opera in HD: Verdi’s Otello

 

 

The Metropolitan Opera in HD: Verdi’s Otello
Saturday, October 17
12 p.m.: Pre-Opera Discussion
1 p.m.: HD Opera Broadcast
Eileen Norris Cinema Theatre/Frank Sinatra Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

The USC School of Cinematic Arts will host a series of satellite broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera presented in spectacular HD digital projection and 5.1 surround sound. Following a pre-opera discussion hosted by Ken Cazan, chair of vocal arts and opera/resident stage director at the USC Thornton School of Music, we will present a delayed satellite broadcast of Verdi’s masterful Otello, which matches Shakespeare’s play in tragic intensity. Director Bartlett Sher probes the Moor’s dramatic downfall with an outstanding cast: tenor Aleksandrs Antonenko plays the doomed Otello; new soprano star Sonya Yoncheva sings Desdemona; and baritone Željko Lučić plays the evil Iago. Dynamic maestro Yannick Nézet-Séguin conducts.
Organized by the USC School of Cinematic Arts in conjunction with the USC Thornton School of Music and the Metropolitan Opera.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 

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Composer, Poet, and Muse: A Concert of Songs by Alan Louis Smith

 

 

Composer, Poet, and Muse: A Concert of Songs by Alan Louis Smith
Tuesday, October 20, 7:30 p.m.
Alfred Newman Recital Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required. While advance reservations are full for USC alumni and the general public, a limited number of tickets are available for USC students, staff, and faculty.

A kind of artistic alchemy occurs when music, words, and performers combine in the performance of a song. Friendships, artistic and professional encounters, and a shared love of words and music are the building blocks of the creative work of composer/poet Alan Louis Smith, professor in the USC Thornton School of Music and one of the nation’s most highly regarded figures in the field of collaborative artistry. In a special concert, international opera stars and other distinguished musicians will perform texts and music either written expressly for or highly influenced by them, including two West Coast premieres. Alan Louis Smith will perform along with mezzo-soprano Stephanie Blythe, baritone Rod Gilfry, soprano Diana Newman, and cellist Jonathan Dormand.
Organized by the USC Thornton School of Music.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Windows on Death Row: Art from Inside and Outside Prison Walls

 

 

Windows on Death Row: Art from Inside and Outside Prison Walls
- Exhibition: Thursday, October 22 to Friday, December 18
- Opening Reception: Thursday, October 22, 5:30 p.m., Annenberg East Lobby, Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism
- Dead Man Walking: The Journey Goes On: A Lecture by Sister Helen Prejean; Introduction by Tim Robbins: Thursday, October 22, 7 p.m., Annenberg Auditorium; Book signing to follow. Books will be sold at the event.
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations requested for the opening reception. Reservations required for the lecture by Sister Helen Prejean.
What are the legal, ethical, religious, political, and policy dimensions of America’s use of the death penalty? Artists and activists, including Tim Robbins and Sister Helen Prejean, will come together for an exhibition and lecture exploring capital punishment not only from the outside, but also from inside Death Row walls. Organized by Swiss journalist Anne-Frédérique Widmann and New York Times cartoonist Patrick Chappatte and curated by Anne Hromadka, this one-of-a-kind exhibition features more than 70 artworks by incarcerated people who were asked to draw and paint their daily life on Death Row. The opening reception will include remarks by actor, director, and activist Tim Robbins and artist Ndume Olatushani, who was wrongfully sentenced to death, spent 28 years in jail, and was freed in 2012. After the reception, join us for a lecture by anti–death penalty activist Sister Helen Prejean, author of the acclaimed memoir Dead Man Walking. Her book was made into the Academy Award–winning film starring Susan Sarandon and Sean Penn and directed by Tim Robbins. Following an introduction by Robbins, Sister Helen will offer a powerful presentation on her struggle to end the death penalty.
Organized by Diane Winston (Journalism), Patrick Chappatte (research fellow), and Anne-Frédérique Widmann.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

The Voice at 100: The Musical Legacy of Frank Sinatra

 

 

The Voice at 100: The Musical Legacy of Frank Sinatra
Friday, October 23, 2 p.m.
Ronald Tutor Campus Center Ballroom
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Frank Sinatra, often referred to as “The Voice,” is perhaps the most iconic American entertainer of the 20th century. His interpretations of the Great American Songbook set the standard for jazz vocal performance. Sinatra’s career embodied the cultural shift that drew entertainers from the East Coast and established Los Angeles as the entertainment capital of the world. On the occasion of his 100th birthday celebration, the USC Thornton School of Music will examine Sinatra’s musical legacy with a panel of experts who worked directly with him, including GRAMMY Award–winning drummer, producer, and record executive Gregg Field and the legendary, multi-GRAMMY Award–winning recording engineer Al Schmitt. The panel will be moderated by Chris Sampson, Vice Dean for Contemporary Music at the USC Thornton School.
Organized by the USC Thornton School of Music in partnership with the GRAMMY Museum.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

An Evening with Robert Schenkkan

 

 

An Evening with Robert Schenkkan
A Visions and Voices Signature Event

Wednesday, October 28, 7 p.m.
Town and Gown
Reception and book signing to follow.
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Join us for a very special evening with Robert Schenkkan, whose new play All the Way won the 2014 Tony Award for Best Play and just about every other major theatre award. Named after Lyndon B. Johnson’s 1964 campaign slogan, “All the Way with LBJ,” the play takes a clear and sometimes brutal look at the struggle to enact civil-rights legislation. Robert Schenkkan received the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1992 for The Kentucky Cycle, a series of one-act plays about the American West. Schenkkan also wrote The Quiet American for Miramax, The Pacific for HBO, and the historical rock musical The Twelve. In a probing reflection, Schenkkan will discuss the work of creating dramas that represent real, complicated histories—histories that illuminate the problems and the possibilities of America.
Co-sponsored by the USC School of Dramatic Arts.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Musical Interpretation Deconstructed

 

 

Musical Interpretation Deconstructed
Paul Dooley and the USC Thornton Wind Ensemble

Sunday, November 1, 4 p.m.
Bovard Auditorium
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Music is in many senses the most abstract art. How does one go beyond simply listening to it to interpreting how it works and what it is saying? A two-part event featuring composer Paul Dooley and the USC Thornton Wind Ensemble will deconstruct musical interpretation, inviting you to explore and understand how music is composed and what it means. Audience members will interactively interpret Richard Wagner’s Siegfried Idyll. Then, USC alumnus Paul Dooley will offer a multimedia interpretation of his newest composition for wind ensemble, Masks and Machines, which will be performed by the USC Thornton Wind Ensemble.
Organized by the USC Thornton School of Music.
RSVP online beginning Thursday, October 8, at 9 a.m. For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

The Dramatic Sinatra: From Here to Eternity

 

 

The Dramatic Sinatra: From Here to Eternity
Friday, November 6, 7 p.m.
The Frank Sinatra Hall at the Eileen Norris Cinema Theatre
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Frank Sinatra burst onto the scene in the Big Band era, and sang to a nation struggling through the war years. In the 1950s, he remade himself as a powerful screen actor. As part of a multi-event tribute to Frank Sinatra, we will screen From Here to Eternity, which swept the 1953 Academy Awards—including an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for Sinatra. From Here to Eternity tells of three soldiers—played by Frank Sinatra, Burt Lancaster, and Montgomery Clift—stationed in Hawaii in the months leading up to the attack on Pearl Harbor. It was an immediate success with critics and audiences alike, with Frank Sinatra’s Oscar-winning performance widely extolled. The New York Post wrote of the singer-turned-screen star, “He proves he is an actor by playing the luckless Maggio with a kind of doomed gaiety that is both real and immensely touching.” Organized by Alessandro Ago and Drew Casper for the USC School of Cinematic Arts with the support of Frank Sinatra Enterprises.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
  For more information on these and other events, please visit our website at visionsandvoices.usc.edu.

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