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MONDAY, OCTOBER 26, 2015   If you are unable to view this email, click here
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Dear Friends:

On Wednesday, don’t miss Robert Schenkkan, the Pulitzer Prize–winning, Tony Award–winning, Writers Guild Award–winning writer whose play All the Way is being made into an HBO film starring Bryan Cranston. Also this week, H. Robert Reynolds, Paul Dooley, and the USC Thornton Wind Ensemble will deconstruct the fascinating art of musical interpretation. Read on for details about these and other exciting events!

–The Visions and Voices Team

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An Evening with Robert Schenkkan

 

 

An Evening with Tony Award Winner Robert Schenkkan
A Visions and Voices Signature Event

Wednesday, October 28, 7 p.m.
Town and Gown
Reception and book signing to follow.
FREE books for the first 50 USC students to arrive!
Admission is free and open to everyone. RSVP online now! Rush tickets will also be available at the event check-in. Check-in opens at 6:15 p.m.

“A magnificent work...a brilliant portrayal no less epic than the great tragedies of classic literature.”—Roma Torre, NY1, on Schenkkan’s All the Way
Join us for a very special evening with Robert Schenkkan, a Pulitzer Prize–winning, Tony Award–winning, Writer's Guild Award–winning, two-time Emmy-nominated writer of stage, television, and film. He is the author of twelve original full-length plays, two musicals, and a collection of one-act plays that represent real, complicated histories and illuminate the problems and possibilities of America. Schenkkan’s most recent play, All the Way, was performed on Broadway and won the 2014 Tony Award and Drama Desk Award for Best Play. The play starred Breaking Bad’s Bryan Cranston, who also won the Tony Award for Best Actor and will star in the HBO film version of the play, currently in production. Named after Lyndon B. Johnson’s 1964 campaign slogan, “All the Way with LBJ,” the play explores themes of race, politics, and power within the struggle to enact civil-rights legislation. USC President C. L. Max Nikias selected All the Way for his summer 2015 reading list, which highlights a few books he believes every USC student should read. The first 50 USC students to arrive at the event will receive a free copy of All the Way!
Co-sponsored by the USC School of Dramatic Arts.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

The Greyhound Diaries

 

 

The Greyhound Diaries
A Performance by Doug Levitt

Thursday, October 29, 7:30 p.m.
Grace Ford Salvatori Hall, Room 106
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations requested. Rush tickets will also be available at the door.

In 2004, singer-songwriter Doug Levitt set out on his first six-week tour by bus. With a guitar, a duct-taped laptop, and a digital camera, he aimed to shed light on the working poor, veterans, and others marginalized in mainstream discourse. Over the decade since, he has traveled more than 100,000 miles on Greyhound buses, rendering the stories of fellow travelers in song, word, and image. Inspired by the Depression-era Work Projects Administration, which drew rich portraits of America at a critical time in its history, Levitt's Greyhound Diaries, a live musical and multimedia performance, illuminates struggle and disparity, but also resolve and renewal. Levitt has performed The Greyhound Diaries in a wide range of venues, including The Kennedy Center, homeless shelters, and Walter Reed Army Hospital. A former foreign correspondent, Levitt has been called “a Woody Guthrie for this time.” He is also the host of The Common, a forthcoming NPR series featuring live songs and stories on a common theme.
Presented by the Diversity Committee of the USC School of Social Work.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Musical Interpretation Deconstructed

 

 

Musical Interpretation Deconstructed
USC Thornton Wind Ensemble
H. Robert Reynolds, Conductor
Sharon Lavery, Conductor
Paul Dooley, Composer

Sunday, November 1, 4 p.m.
Bovard Auditorium
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required. RSVP online now! Rush tickets will also be available at the event check-in. Check-in opens at 3:15 p.m.

Paul Dooley and the USC Thornton Wind Ensemble invite you to learn the fascinating art of musical interpretation. How do you go beyond simply listening to music to interpreting how it works and what it is saying? In the first half of the program, the audience will interactively deconstruct Richard Wagner’s Siegfried Idyll with conductor H. Robert Reynolds. In the second half, award-winning composer and USC alumnus Paul Dooley will offer a multimedia interpretation of his composition Masks and Machines. Dooley, professor of performing-arts technology and electronic music at the University of Michigan, will discuss works of visual art that inspired the composition before a performance by the USC Thornton Wind Ensemble.
Organized by the USC Thornton School of Music.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

The Musical and Comedic Sinatra

 

 

The Musical and Comedic Sinatra
Sunday, November 1, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.
Eileen Norris Cinema Theatre/Frank Sinatra Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required. RSVP online now! Rush tickets will also be available at the door.

One of the best-selling musical artists of all time, Frank Sinatra was also a powerful film actor. In addition to his critically acclaimed dramatic performances, Sinatra charmed audiences in comedies and musicals. As part of a multi-event tribute to Frank Sinatra on the 100th anniversary of his birth, the USC School of Cinematic Arts will present a day of screenings of his much-loved comedic and musical films: On the Town, High Society, The Joker Is Wild, The Tender Trap, and Guys and Dolls.
Organized by Alessandro Ago and Drew Casper for the USC School of Cinematic Arts with the support of Frank Sinatra Enterprises.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Sinatra on Film: The Music of Acting on Screen

 

 

Sinatra on Film: The Music of Acting on Screen
Thursday, November 5, 7 p.m.
Forum Room, Ronald Tutor Campus Center 450
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Frank Sinatra burst onto the scene in the Big Band era, and sang to a nation struggling through the war years. In the 1950s, he remade himself as a powerful screen actor. As part of a multi-event tribute to Frank Sinatra on the 100th anniversary of his birth, Sharon Carnicke of the USC School of Dramatic Arts will examine how Sinatra used what he had learned from singing about tempo, rhythm, and phrasing to craft emotionally loaded acting performances. Professor Sharon Carnicke is an internationally known expert on actor training and film acting. She will demonstrate the relationship between Sinatra’s singing and acting by drawing from a range of films, including Anchors Aweigh, From Here to Eternity, Suddenly, High Society, and The Manchurian Candidate.
Organized by the USC School of Dramatic Arts.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

The Dramatic Sinatra: From Here to Eternity

 

 

The Dramatic Sinatra: From Here to Eternity
Friday, November 6, 7 p.m.
Eileen Norris Cinema Theatre/Frank Sinatra Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Frank Sinatra burst onto the scene in the Big Band era, and sang to a nation struggling through the war years. In the 1950s, he remade himself as a powerful screen actor. As part of a multi-event tribute to Frank Sinatra, we will screen From Here to Eternity, which swept the 1953 Academy Awards—including an Oscar for Best Supporting Actor for Sinatra. From Here to Eternity tells of three soldiers—played by Frank Sinatra, Burt Lancaster, and Montgomery Clift—stationed in Hawaii in the months leading up to the attack on Pearl Harbor. It was an immediate success with critics and audiences alike, with Frank Sinatra’s Oscar-winning performance widely extolled. The New York Post wrote of the singer-turned-screen star, “He proves he is an actor by playing the luckless Maggio with a kind of doomed gaiety that is both real and immensely touching.”
Organized by Alessandro Ago and Drew Casper for the USC School of Cinematic Arts with the support of Frank Sinatra Enterprises.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

The Dramatic Sinatra and Legacy Panel

 

 

The Dramatic Sinatra and Legacy Panel
Sunday, November 8, 10 a.m. to 10:15 p.m.
Eileen Norris Cinema Theatre/Frank Sinatra Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Join us for a full day of screenings and discussion celebrating the powerful film acting of Frank Sinatra, who appeared in 55 films over 44 years, winning an Oscar and much critical acclaim. As part of a multi-event tribute to Sinatra on the 100th anniversary of his birth, the USC School of Cinematic Arts will celebrate his dramatic film performances with screenings of Suddenly, The Man with the Golden Arm, Some Came Running, and The Manchurian Candidate. A keynote lecture by USC professor Drew Casper and a Q&A with Nancy Sinatra and Tina Sinatra will explore the legacy of this legendary entertainer.
Organized by Alessandro Ago and Drew Casper for the USC School of Cinematic Arts with the support of Frank Sinatra Enterprises.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 

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History of the Cello

 

 

History of the Cello: The Instrument and Its Evolution, 1600–2014
Thursday, November 12, 7:30 p.m.
Alfred Newman Recital Hall
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Join Ralph Kirshbaum, the chair of the USC Thornton School of Music String Department and one of the world’s top cellists, for the first event in a two-part series on the history of the cello. Kirshbaum will trace the development of the cello as a physical instrument through four centuries, beginning with the family of viols, continuing through the viola da gamba, and arriving at the modern cello, a member of the violin family. Instruments from all of these periods will be shown and demonstrated by young artists from the USC Thornton School of Music, revealing the physical and tonal changes that have occurred throughout the years. A senior luthier will give a detailed talk on the physical properties of these various instruments, accompanied by illustrative film clips.
Organized by the USC Thornton School of Music.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Frank Gehry

 

 

Frank Gehry
An Experience L.A. Event

Saturday, November 14
Depart USC at 10:30 a.m.; return at 2 p.m.
Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Los Angeles
Admission is free and open to USC students only. Reservations required. While advance reservations are full, we are currently accepting waitlist reservations.

Encounter the many aspects of starchitect Frank Gehry in a fascinating retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). Gehry has revolutionized architecture. His innovation and ability to push the boundaries of his medium garnered him architecture’s top honor, the Pritzker Prize, in 1989. His pioneering work in digital technologies set in motion the practices adopted by the construction industry today. From Walt Disney Concert Hall to the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, the works of the Canadian-born, Los Angeles–based architect are instantly recognizable and hugely influential—leading Vanity Fair to call him “the most important architect of our age.” Frank Gehry, a major exhibition at LACMA, presents a comprehensive examination of Gehry’s extraordinary body of work from the early 1960s to the present, featuring over 200 drawings, many of which have never before been seen publicly, and 65 models that reveal the evolution of Gehry’s thinking. Join us for a special trip to LACMA to reflect on one of the great minds of contemporary architecture.
Open to USC students only. Students must use the provided transportation. For more info and to sign up for the waitlist, click here.

 

 
 

Korean Hip Hop: A Conversation and Concert

 

 

Korean Hip Hop: Garion, Dok2, The Quiett, and DJ Son
Tuesday, November 17, 7 p.m.
Bovard Auditorium
Admission is free and open to everyone. Reservations required.

Meet five iconic South Korean hip hop artists—pioneering duo Garion (MC Meta and Naachal), rap superstars Dok2 and The Quiett, and award-winning battle DJ and turntablist DJ Son—in an exciting concert and conversation. How did hip hop travel across musical, linguistic, geographical, and sociocultural boundaries to root itself in Korea? Now that it’s there, how is hip hop understood and lived in Korea? We invite you to follow the global travels of music through the lives and works of five influential artists who have made history in Korean hip hop. Josh Kun and Myoung-Sun (Kelly) Song of the USC Annenberg School for Communication and Journalism will engage these artists in a fascinating conversation about the meaning of hip hop in Korean society. Then, the artists will take the stage for an exciting live concert.
Organized by Josh Kun (Communication) and Myoung-Sun (Kelly) Song (Communication). Co-sponsored by the USC Korean Studies Institute.
RSVP online now! For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 
 

Antigone By Jean Anouilh

 

 

Antigone
By Jean Anouilh
Adapted and Translated by Robertson Dean
An Experience L.A. Event

Thursday, November 19
Depart USC at 6 p.m.; return at 11:30 p.m.
A Noise Within, Pasadena
Admission is free and open to USC students only. Reservations required.

Join USC president C. L. Max Nikias for a performance of Jean Anouilh’s reimagining of Antigone. This adaptation of Sophocles’ classic tragedy about morality in the face of immoral power dares us to choose between our personal values and those of the world in which we live. The performance will be followed by a conversation with President Nikias and director Robertson Dean. Jean Anouilh was one of France’s most important writers in the decades following World War II, and Antigone is perhaps his best-known work. Produced under Nazi censorship and first performed in Paris in 1944, it has been widely interpreted as an allegory for the French resistance and the Nazi occupation. Anouilh’s Antigone will be performed by A Noise Within, a Pasadena-based theatre company that promotes classical theatre as an essential means for our community to confront the universal human experience. One of drama’s most compelling heroines, Antigone accepts her fate with fearless grace—and dares us all to rise to the greater good.
Open to USC students only. Students must use the provided transportation. RSVP online beginning Tuesday, October 27, at 9 a.m For more info and to RSVP, click here.

 

 

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Los Angeles Times Ideas Exchange with Shonda Rhimes

 

 

Los Angeles Times Ideas Exchange with Shonda Rhimes
Monday, November 16, 7:30 p.m.
Bovard Auditorium
Tickets required. Discount tickets available for USC students. See below for details.

Here’s a rare opportunity to see Hollywood’s most powerful woman in person. Shonda Rhimes, the critically acclaimed and award-winning creator and executive producer of the hit television series Grey’s Anatomy, Private Practice, and Scandal, and the executive producer of How to Get Away With Murder, will discuss her new book, Year of Yes, at this Ideas Exchange presented by the Los Angeles Times.
Admission: Tickets are on sale now. A limited number of tickets are available at a student price of $15.00 for USC students only, while supplies last. Use promotional code USCShonda for access to USC student tickets.
For more info and to purchase tickets, click here.

 

 
  For more information on these and other events, please visit our website at visionsandvoices.usc.edu.

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