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Databases for Holocaust & Genocide Studies

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Holocaust & Genocide Studies

  • 20th Century German History Online
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    Includes two databases. National Socialism, Holocaust, Resistance and Exile, 1933-1945, is a database containing fundamental primary sources on the Nationalist Socialist State and the NSDAP, Nazi ideology and propaganda, National Socialist justice and legislation, on resistance and persecution, and annihilation and expulsion in the “Third Reich”. These carefully compiled and digitized documents contain total of approximately 40,000 sources with about 450,000 pages.Daily Reports of the Gestapo Headquarters in Vienna 1938-1945 is a research database containing all 741 surviving reports outlining the mood, the political environment and security measures in Vienna and the surrounding region. Published, for the first time, the individual reports are published as first time facsimiles. The photo collection is compiled from the (once confidential) records department of the Gestapo in Vienna.User Interface: English and German; Language: German.
  • Archives Unbound
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    This Gale database includes the following digitized archival collections: 1) Correspondence from German Concentration Camps and Prisons; 2) County and Regional Histories & Atlases: California; 3) Japanese-American Relocation Camp Newspapers: Perspectives on Day-to-Day Life; 4) Jewish Underground Resistance: The David Diamant Collection; 5) Nuremburg Laws and Nazi Annulment of German Jewish Nationality.
  • Collecting and Provenance Research, Getty Research Institute
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    The Getty Research Institute is one of the richest resources for the study of provenance and the history of western European art collecting. Holdings include an extensive collection of dealer and auction catalogs, primary source material, etc. The Getty produces and maintains databases which index transcriptions of material from auction catalogs and archival inventories of European art works. Includes several Research Guides and Bibliographies. Nearly one million records cover art from the late 16th to the early 20th century. The databases are: Getty Provenance Index, Collectors' Files, Payments to Artists
  • Daily Reports of the Gestapo Headquarters Vienna 1938-1945
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    Daily Reports of the Gestapo Headquarters in Vienna 1938-1945 is a research database containing all 741 surviving reports outlining the mood, the political environment and security measures in Vienna and the surrounding region. Published, for the first time, the individual reports are published as first time facsimiles. The photo collection is compiled from the (once confidential) records department of the Gestapo in Vienna.
    User Interface: English and German; Language: German.
  • Felix Posen Bibliographic Project on Antisemitism
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    Felix Posen Bibliographic Project on Antisemitism: A computerizedbibliography on Antisemitism and the Holocaust. A comprehensivedatabase: all periods, all languages, all countries. More than 50,000entries. Abstracts in English for each item. Currently covers publicationsfrom 1925 to the present.
  • German Concentration Camp and Prison Camp Correspondence
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    This collection consists of items originating from prisoners held in German concentration camps, internment and transit camps, Gestapo prisons, and POW camps, during and just prior to World War II. Most of the materials are letters written or received by prisoners, but also included are receipts for parcels, money orders and personal effects; paper currency; and realia, including Star of David badges that Jews were forced to wear.
  • International Military Tribunal for Germany (Nuremberg Trials)
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    The Nuremberg Trials were a series of military tribunals, held by the victorious Allied forces of World War II, most notable for the prosecution of prominent members of the political, military, and economic leadership of the defeated Nazi Germany. The trials were held in the city of Nuremberg, Bavaria, Germany, in 1945–46, at the Palace of Justice. The first and best known of these trials was the Trial of the Major War Criminals before the International Military Tribunal (IMT), which tried 24 of the most important captured leaders of Nazi Germany, though several key architects of the war (such as Adolf Hitler, Heinrich Himmler, and Joseph Goebbels) had committed suicide before the trials began.
    This website provides much of the transcripts that were taken from these trials.
  • Jewish Question: Records from the Berlin Document Center
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    This collection comprises documents from a wide variety of sources, including the Gestapo, local police and government offices, Reich ministries, businesses, etc., pertaining to Jewish communities. These records are organized into various sub-collections, i.e., Archiv Schumacher, Streicher, Hans Frank, Hauptarchiv der NSDAP, Geschaedigte Juden, etc., and Ordner, or folders, and include newspaper clippings, letters, manuscripts, pamphlets, reports and other documents originating with the Sturmabteilung (SA), Schutzstaffel (SS), Gestapo, Reich Ministry of Justice, and Reichskulturkammer (RKK, Reich Chamber of Culture) from 1920- 1945.
  • Jewish Underground Resistance: The David Diamant Collection, 1939-1945
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    David Diamant is the pseudonym of David Erlich, a Jewish communist and committed member of the underground resistance during World War II. This collection consists of 1,235 pages of original documents collected by Diamant over a period of approximately 30 years dealing primarily with the Jewish segment of the French underground resistance; many of the documents originate with communist groups, and some deal with Polish groups. Most of the documents are in French, while some are in Yiddish.
  • National Socialism, Holocaust, Resistance and Exile, 1933-1945
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    National Socialism, Holocaust, Resistance and Exile, 1933-1945, is a database containing fundamental primary sources on the Nationalist Socialist State and the NSDAP, Nazi ideology and propaganda, National Socialist justice and legislation, on resistance and persecution, and annihilation and expulsion in the “Third Reich”. These carefully compiled and digitized documents contain total of approximately 40,000 sources with about 450,000 pages.
    User Interface: English and German; Language: German.
  • Nuremburg Laws and Nazi Annulment of German Jewish Nationality
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    This collection consists of index cards listing the name, date and place of birth, occupation and last address of Jews whose German citizenship was revoked in accordance with the "Nuremberg Laws" of 1935, including Jews from Germany, Austria and Czech Bohemia. The cards are generally in alphabetical order. Suffix names "Israel" for men and "Sara" for women were added by law in 1936 to readily identify persons of Jewish descent.
  • Online Encyclopedia of Mass Violence (OEMV)
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    The Online Encyclopedia of Mass Violence (OEMV) is a regularly updated electronic database focusing on massacres and genocides of the 20th century. Currently, there is no tool available that documents and classifies our knowledge by continent, country and historical period. The OEMV's first objective is to fill this gap by offering reliable historical description and interdisciplinary analysis of both well-documented and less well-known 20th century massacres. Resources provided include chronological indexes, case studies, analytical contributions on socio-political violence in a given country, a glossary of the terms most often used in the field of genocide studies as well as theoretical papers written by the most representative authors in the field.
  • Post War Europe: Refugees, Exile and Resettlement, 1945-1950
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    Post-War Europe: Refugees, Exile and Resettlement, 1945-1950 provides a unique perspective on the lives of the survivors — Jewish and non-Jewish — of the Holocaust and World War II. The collection contains documents from British government files as well as those of the Jewish Committee for Relief Abroad and the Jewish Relief Units — including surveys, leaflets, reports of relief workers, U.S. zone reports, War office memos, Exodus Camp records, Displaced Persons Assembly Centre weekly reports and correspondence of relief organizations. It covers the international politics leading the administration, care, repatriation and emigration of Displaced Persons (DPs) and the daily plight of the refugees themselves.
  • RAMBI: The Index of Articles on Jewish Studies
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    RAMBI - The Index of Articles on Jewish Studies - is a selective bibliography of articles in the various fields of Jewish studies and in the study of Eretz Israel. Material listed in Rambi is compiled from thousands of periodicals and from collections of articles - in Hebrew, Yiddish, and European languages- mainly from the holdings of the Jewish National and University Library, a world center for research on the Jewish people and Eretz Israel. The main criterion for inclusion in the bibliography is that the article be based on scientific research, or contain important information for such research. Since the inception of this bibliographic project in 1966, the editorial board has striven to include in it all of the important articles published throughout the world in the field of Judaica. Therefore, it includes offprints of articles from journals or collections not on order to the Library. RAMBI also lists articles from secondary sources.
  • Shoah Foundation Institute Visual History Archive
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    Presents nearly 52,000 testimonies of survivors and other witnesses of the Holocaust, representing individuals from 56 countries, speaking in 32 languages. While the majority of the interviews are with Jewish Holocaust survivors (around 49,000), the archive also includes the testimonies of political prisoners, Sinti and Roma (Gypsy) survivors, Jehovah's Witness survivors, survivors of eugenics policies, and homosexual survivors as well as rescuers, liberators, and participants in war crimes trials.
  • Testaments to the Holocaust
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    Documents and rare printed materials from the Wiener Library, London This digital resource offers the unique resources of the world’s oldest Holocaust museum.
  • U.S. Relations with the Vatican and the Holocaust, 1940-1950
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    Correspondence, reports and more explore America’s relations with the Vatican during World War II and the Holocaust. This collection consists of the State Department’s records of the personal representative of the President to Pope Pius XII, including the Decimal File, Confidential Correspondence File and the Airgrams File.
  • USC Digital Library
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    The USC Digital Library (USCDL) is the digital repository for original research materials which have been selected for archiving by the Libraries. Content made available by the USCDL facilitates new and creative opportunities for scholarship and teaching by providing enhanced access to materials which feature and highlight the Libraries' holdings or from non-Library held collections identified in collaboration with members of the USC academic community. Accordingly, the USCDL provides a wealth of primary and original source material in a variety of formats. These may include, but are not limited to USC theses and dissertations; photographs; rare books, or portions thereof; manuscripts; source documents; sound recordings; moving images; data sets; 'born digital' documents; and digital representations of physical objects. USCDL content can be licensed or sub-licensed to parties outside of USC.
  • World Memory Project
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    Millions of documents containing details about victims of the Holocaust and Nazi persecutionduring World War II still exist today. Through the World Memory Project, you can help makethese victims' records searchable online and restore the identities of people the Nazis tried to erasefrom history, one person at a time.