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Finding aid of the Dan Siminoski Collection on Federal Bureau of Investigation Surveillance of Gays and Lesbians

Finding aid prepared by Michael P. Palmer, © 2007

Summary Information

Repository
ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives, USC Libraries, University of Southern California
Creator
Siminoski, Dan (b. 1947)
Title
Dan Siminoski collection on Federal Bureau of Investigation surveillance of gays and lesbians
Collection no.
Coll2007.002
Date [bulk]
Bulk, 1953-1986
Date [inclusive]
1953-2001 (bulk 1953-1986)
Extent
7.5 linear feet.
Language
English
Abstract
The collection comprises materials received, collected, and created by Dan Siminoski in the course of prosecuting his 1982 request under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), and the subsequent 1983 lawsuit, for copies of FBI documents relating to the Bureau's surveillance of gays and lesbians from 1950 to 1982. The materials include photocopies of approximately 2,200 documents (7,000 pages) from FBI Headquarters and various regional offices, relating primarily to the Daughters of Bilitis, Gay Activists Alliance, Gay Liberation Front, and the Mattachine Society, as well as indexes, summaries, and various statistical analyses of these documents. Additional materials include the legal filings in the case, litigation correspondence, drafts by Siminoski and his counsel of various legal filings, and materials relating to Siminoski's speaking tour and media campaign to publicize his lawsuit. Personal and professional materials in the collection include personal correspondence, copies and drafts of scholarly articles, conference presentations, Siminoski's syndicated column for Stonewall Features, and pieces for other publications; his academic vita; and his will.

Preferred Citation

Box #, folder #, Dan Siminoski Collection on Federal Bureau of Investigation Surveillance of Gays and Lesbians, Coll2007-002, ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives, Los Angeles, California.

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Biography

Dan Siminoski was born in Los Angeles on January 1, 1947, to a progressive family. He displayed his commitment to human rights at an early age, when he co-chaired Mid-City Youth Against Proposition 14, a state-wide initiative to invalidate the California Fair Housing Law. He studied at the University of California at Berkeley, where he was involved in the Free Speech and anti-war movements and became the Berkeley co-chairman of Senator Eugene McCarthy's presidential campaign; he received a BA in Political Science and was elected to Phi Beta Kappa in 1968. Before entering graduate school, Siminoski served as a staff investigator for the Fair Campaign Practices Committee in Washington, DC, and then as legislative aid to Senator Wayne Morse. He earned his MA with honors in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin in 1970, when he was also awarded a Ford Fellowship. His doctoral research brought Siminoski back to Los Angeles where he came out in 1973 and became active in gay rights causes. In 1976-1977, he was an Instructor in the Social Sciences Department at Long Beach City College. He received his PhD in Political Science from the University of Wisconsin in 1978. In 1979-1980, he was Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at Arizona State University, and in 1980-1981, he held the same position at the University of Missouri St. Louis. He was appointed Visiting Lecturer in Political Science at Texas Tech University in 1981.

His long-held interest in gay and lesbian civil rights led Siminoski to file a request with the Federal Bureau of Investigation under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) on October 22, 1982, for copies of all FBI Headquarters and field office records relating to the surveillance of gays and lesbians from 1950 to 1982. When the FBI failed to comply with the request fully and in a timely manner, Siminoski, represented by the ACLU Foundation of Southern California, filed suit against the Bureau in Federal District Court in Los Angeles, on October 11, 1983. Simultaneously, Siminoski, who had left teaching and moved to Los Angeles in the late summer of 1983 to devote himself full-time to the impending lawsuit, launched Siminoski vs. FBI 1984 , a speaking tour and media campaign to publicize his case. Although the FBI began releasing documents in quantity to him by the end of the first quarter of 1984, Siminoski continued his case on the grounds that the documents were unnecessarily redacted. In late 1984, Siminoski, whose project had found a home at Jim Kepner s International Gay and Lesbian Archives (formerly Western Gay Archives) at 1654 North Hudson St., initiated the Freedom of Information Project. The purpose of this project was to analyze the documents released by the FBI and to gather signed and notarized Privacy Act Waiver Forms from leading gay activists, with the intention of turning his legal action into a class action lawsuit and expanding the scope of the FBI records sought. Although Siminoski collected properly executed Privacy Act Waiver Forms from a number of prominent gay activists, this latter purpose was not realized.

In 1986, Siminoski, who had supported himself since leaving teaching as a free-lance political consultant and syndicated columnist, withdrew for health reasons from active participation in the lawsuit. In 1988, he earned a master's degree in Social Work from California State University Long Beach. He now lives in San Diego. In November 1988, Ralph J. Geffen, acting as Special Master, reported favorably on most of Siminoski's legal claims; however, many of his recommendations were overruled by Judge William D. Keller in his decision of January 1990, which was not appealed.

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Scope and Content of Collection

The Dan Siminoski Collection on Federal Bureau of Investigation Surveillance of Gays and Lesbians comprises materials received, collected, and created by Siminoski as a consequence of his 1982 request under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), and subsequent 1983 lawsuit, for copies of FBI documents relating to the Bureau's surveillance of gays and lesbians from 1950 to 1982. These materials include photocopies of approximately 2,200 documents (7,000 pages) from FBI Headquarters and various regional offices, relating primarily to the Daughters of Bilitis, Gay Activists Alliance, Gay Liberation Front, and the Mattachine Society, as well as indexes, summaries, and various statistical analyses of these documents. The materials also include Siminoski's correspondence with the FBI and with his legal counsel, the legal filings in the case, litigation correspondence between counsel for both parties, drafts by Siminoski and his counsel of various legal filings, additional attorney notes and drafts, and materials relating to Siminoski's lawsuit and to his speaking tour and media campaign to publicize it. The collection contains materials collected by Siminoski relating to the implementation of the FOIA by federal law enforcement agencies, in particular the FBI, including photocopies of extensive portions of FBI Headquarters file 190-3, relating to the impact of the FOIA and the Privacy Act on law enforcement activities. Personal and professional materials in the collection include personal correspondence not directly connected with the FOIA request and lawsuit; copies and drafts of scholarly articles, conference presentations, Siminoski's syndicated column for Stonewall Features, and pieces for The News and  The Advocate; Siminoski's academic vita; and his will.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

ONE National Gay & Lesbian Archives, USC Libraries, University of Southern California
© 2007
909 West Adams Boulevard
Los Angeles, California, 90007
(213) 821-2771
askone@usc.edu

Access

The collection is open to researchers. There are no access restrictions.

Publication Rights

Researchers wishing to publish materials must obtain permission in writing from ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives as the physical owner. Researchers must also obtain clearance from the holder(s) of any copyrights in the materials. Note that ONE National Gay and Lesbian Archives can grant copyright clearance only for those materials for which we hold the copyright. It is the responsibility of the researcher to obtain copyright clearance for all other materials directly from the copyright holder(s).

Acquisition Information

Gift of Dan Siminoski, January 30, 2002

Processing Information

Formerly housed in boxes 103-092, 103-204, 103-304, 103-05, 103-348, 103-350, 103-357, 104-001, 104-028, and 104-029. Collection processed by Michael Palmer, February, 2007; revised June 18, 2007.

Processing this collection has been funded by a generous grant from the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • ACLU Foundation of Southern California
  • Daughters of Bilitis
  • East Coast Homophile Organization
  • Gay Activists Alliance
  • Gay Liberation Front
  • Mattachine Society.
  • National Gay Task Force
  • ONE, Inc
  • Radical Lesbians
  • Society for Individual Rights
  • United States. Federal Bureau of Investigation--Archives
  • United States. Federal Bureau of Investigation--Surveillance

Personal Name(s)

  • Siminoski, Dan, 1947-

Subject(s)

  • Gay rights--United States--History--20th century

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Collection Inventory

Series 1:  Series 1. Federal Bureau of Investigation Files 1953-1984   4.8 linear feet.

Series Scope and Content

This series contains the records of the FBI obtained by Dan Siminoski as a consequence of his FOIA request dated October 22, 1982, and of the lawsuit filed on his behalf by the ACLU Foundation of Southern California on October 11, 1983, as well as materials created or collected by Siminoski in the course of analyzing these records. The records released by the FBI total approximately 2,200 documents, or 7,000 pages, from FBI Headquarters and various regional offices and relating primarily to the Daughters of Bilitis, Gay Activists Alliance, Gay Liberation Front, and the Mattachine Society. The analytical documents include a "Vaughn Index" to the documents, prepared by the FBI; document summaries, in several formats (typescript, manuscript, and on audio tape cassette); lists of documents and the "exemption codes" by which the FBI justified its redactions; document coding forms and instructions; and analytical and statistical notes compiled by Siminoski. The series is divided into two subseries: 1. Headquarters and Field Office Files, containing the files themselves, and 2. Document Analysis, containing Siminoski's analysis of the records, and related documents.

 Subseries 1.1. Headquarters and Field Office Files 1953-1979   3.1 linear feet.

Subseries Scope and Content

This subseries comprises the copies of FBI files released to Siminoski by the Bureau as a consequence of his letter of October 22, 1982, and his lawsuit filed on October 11, 1983. The files are arranged alphabetically by the name of the gay or lesbian organization they concern: the Daughters of Bilitis, East Coast Homophile Organization (ECHO), Gay Activists Alliance, Gay Liberation Front, Mattachine Society, National Gay Task Force, ONE, Radical Lesbians, and Society for Individual Rights. Within each organizational group, files are ordered according to the FBI office that maintained the file: FBI Headquarters in Washington, DC, and the following field offices, in alphabetical order: Albany, Baltimore, Boston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Denver, Detroit, Los Angeles, Miami, Minneapolis, New York, Newark, Philadelphia, San Diego, San Francisco, and the Washington, DC. The materials total approximately 2,200 documents, or 7,000 pages, and date from the early 1950s to the late 1970s. The bulk of the materials relate to the Mattachine Society and the Gay Liberation Front; the earliest documents concern the Mattachine Society, and the Daughters of Bilitis. The files for the Mattachine Society also include material on ONE Magazine and One., Inc. Over half the materials consist of organizational publications, including newsletters, pamphlets, calendars, and magazines, several of which, such as the Ladder,  Mattachine Review, and  ONE Magazine, were publicly sold on newsstands. Other materials include descriptions of private and public meetings and lists of people attending them, photographs of public demonstrations, and correspondence concerning the activities of known and suspected homosexuals. There is considerable duplication of materials, in particular between FBI Headquarters and the individual field offices, but also between various field offices. Approximately 70 per cent of the materials are redacted (censored), some heavily so: many sheets are place-holders for pages withheld in their entirety. Both photocopies of original redacted pages and place-holder sheets are marked with one or more "exemption" codes indicating the reason for the redaction or withholding. The series also includes a number of "revised" documents, second releases of materials already delivered to Siminoski. In most cases the "revised" documents contain fewer redactions than those released earlier; however, in a few cases, they contain more revisions.

Box Folder

 Listing of FBI surveillance files by file number circa 1986 

1 1

 Daughters of Bilitis 1956-1973 

Box Folder

 FBI Headquarters 1966-1971 

1 2

 FBI Headquarters file 31-90277 1964 

1 3

 FBI Boston 1971-1973 

1 4

 FBI Los Angeles 1971-1972 

1 5

 FBI New York 1970 

1 6

 FBI San Francisco file 94-843, volume 1 1956-1966 

1 7

 FBI San Francisco file 94-843, volume 2 1966-1979 

1 8

 FBI San Francisco file 94-843. Sub A Exhibits 1956-1961 

1 9

 East Coast Homophile Organization (ECHO) 1965 

Box Folder

 FBI Headquarters file 163-12514 1965 

1 10

 Gay Activists Alliance 1970-1979 

Box Folder

 FBI Headquarters 1972-1974 

1 11

 FBI Headquarters file 100-469170 1971-1976 

1 12

 FBI Headquarters file 100-469170. Revised documents 1972-1974 

1 13

 FBI Albany file 100-22972 1972 

1 14

 FBI Baltimore file 100-30225 1972 

1 15

 FBI Baltimore file 100-30225. Revised document 1972 

1 16

 FBI Boston 1977 

1 17

 FBI Cincinnati file 100-20096 1971-1975 

1 18-19

 FBI Cincinnati file 100-20096. Revised Documents 1971-1973 

1 20

 FBI Cincinnati file 100-20096. Sub A Exhibits 1972-1975 

1 21

 FBI Detroit file 100-40944 1972 

2 1

 FBI Miami file 100-16589 1972 

2 2

 FBI Miami file 100-16589. Revised Documents 1972 

2 3

 FBI Miami file 100-16589-1A 1972 

2 4

 FBI New York no date 

2 5

 FBI New York file 52-11200 1974-1979 

2 6

 FBI New York file 100-170388 1970-1974 

2 7

 FBI New York file 100-170388. Revised Documents 1971-1974 

2 8

 FBI Newark file 100-55060 1972 

2 9

 FBI San Francisco file 100-73494 1975 

2 10

 FBI Washington Field Office 1971-1972 

2 11

 Gay Liberation Front 1969-1978 

Box Folder

 FBI Headquarters 1969-1972 

14 1

 FBI Headquarters file 100-450225 1970-1972 

2 12

 FBI Headquarters file 100-450225. Revised Documents 1970 

2 13

 FBI Headquarters file 100-464380 1971 

2 14

 FBI Headquarters file 100-464462 1971 

2 15

 FBI Headquarters file 100-470952 1972 

2 16

 FBI Headquarters file 100-470952. Revised Documents 1972 

2 17

 FBI Headquarters file 100-472348 1972 

2 18

 FBI Headquarters file 174-7829 1977 

2 19

 FBI Boston 1970-1971 

2 20

 FBI Boston file 100-42796 1971 

2 21

 FBI Chicago file 100-49116 1970-1972 

2 22

 FBI Chicago file 100-49116. Revised Documents 1970 

2 23

 FBI Cincinnati file 100-20632 1972 

2 24

 FBI Cincinnati file 100-20632. Revised Document 1972 

2 25

 FBI Cleveland file 100-32464 1972 

2 26

 FBI Cleveland file 100-32464. Revised Documents 1972-1974 

3 1

 FBI Cleveland file 100-32540 1971-1972   2.0 volumes

3 2-3

 FBI Cleveland file 100-32540. Revised Documents 1972 

3 4

 FBI Detroit file 100-37274 1970-1972 

3 5

 FBI Detroit file 100-37274. Revised Documents 1971 

3 6

 FBI Los Angeles 1970-1971 

3 7

 FBI Los Angeles file 100-76507 1970-1975   3.0 volumes

3 8-10

 FBI Los Angeles file 100-76507. Revised Documents 1970-1973 

4 1

 FBI Minneapolis file 100-14970 1970 

4 2

 FBI Minneapolis file 100-14970. Revised Documents no date 

4 3

 FBI New York 1969-1971 

4 4

 FBI Philadelphia file 100-52208 1970-1972 

4 5

 FBI Philadelphia file 100-52208. Revised Documents 1970 

4 6

 FBI San Diego file 100-15560 1970-1972 

4 7

 FBI San Diego file 100-15560. Revised Documents 1970-1972 

4 8

 FBI San Francisco 1970-1972 

4 9

 FBI San Francisco file 100-65673 1970-1975 

4 10

 FBI San Francisco file 100-65673. Revised Documents 1970-1972 

4 11

 FBI San Francisco file 174-1625 1977 

4 12

 FBI San Francisco file 174-1677 1977-1978 

4 13

 FBI Washington Field Office 1970-1972 

4 14

 FBI Washington Field Office file 100-52906 1970-1973 

4 15

 FBI Washington Field Office file 100-52906. Revised Documents no date 

4 16

 Mattachine Society 1953-1972 

Box Folder

 FBI Headquarters 1962-1966 

4 17

 FBI Headquarters file 100-403320, volume 1 1953 

14 2

 FBI Headquarters file 100-403320, volume 2 1954-1956 

4 18

 FBI Headquarters file 100-403320, volume 3 1956   2.0 parts.

5 1-2

 FBI Headquarters file 100-403320, volume 4 1956-1957 

5 3

 FBI Headquarters file 100-403320, volume 5 1956-1961 

5 4

 FBI Headquarters file 100-403320, volume 6 1961-1966 

14 3

 FBI Headquarters file 100-403320. Revised Documents 1953-1963 

14 4

 FBI Baltimore file 105-2377 1957 

5 5

 FBI Boston file 100-31634 1960 

5 6

 FBI Chicago file 100-32819 no date 

5 7

 FBI Denver file 100-8362 1959 

5 8

 FBI Detroit file 100-27579 1954-1959 

5 9

 FBI Los Angeles 1956-1964 

5 10

 FBI Los Angeles file 100-45888, volume 1 1953-1958 

5 11

 FBI Los Angeles file 100-45888, volume 2 1954-1959 

6 1

 FBI Los Angeles file 100-45888. Revised Documents 1954-1965 

6 2

 FBI New York 1965-1966 

6 3

 FBI New York file 100-132065 (3 folders) 1956-1964 

6 4-6

 FBI New York file 100-132065. Revised Documents 1959-1963 

6 7

 FBI San Francisco file 100-37894, volume 1 1953-1961 

6 8

 FBI San Francisco file 100-37894, volume 2 1961-1968 

6 9

 FBI San Francisco file 100-37394. Revised Document 1961 

6 10

 FBI San Francisco file 100-37394. Sub A Exhibits 1953-1963 

7 1

 FBI Seattle file 100-22500 1953-1963 

7 2

 FBI Washington Field Office no date 

7 3

 FBI Washington Field Office file 100-33796, volume 1 1957-1963 

7 4

 FBI Washington Field Office file 100-33796, volume 2 1972 

7 5

 FBI Washington Field Office file 100-33796. Revised Documents 1962-1965 

7 6

 National Gay Task Force 1975-1982 

Box Folder

 FBI Headquarters file 9-63959 1978 

7 7

 FBI Headquarters file 62-118584 1980-1982 

7 8

 FBI Denver 1980 

7 9

 FBI New York 1975 

7 10

 ONE, Inc. 1960-1966 

Box Folder

 FBI Headquarters 1966 

7 11

 FBI Los Angeles 1960-1961 

7 12

 Radical Lesbians no date 

Box Folder

 FBI New York no date 

7 13

 Society for Individual Rights 1965-1973 

Box Folder

 FBI Headquarters 1965-1972 

7 14

 FBI Headquarters file 62-114520 1971-1973 

14 5

 FBI New York 1968 

7 15

 Subseries 1.2. Document Analysis 1953-1984   1.7 linear feet.

Subseries Scope and Content

This subseries contains the materials created or collected by Siminoski in the course of analyzing the documents released to him by the FBI. The FBI was required to deliver to Siminoski a "Vaughn Index" to the documents it released, identifying each document, indicating the statutory exemption (for redaction or withdrawal) claimed, and explaining how disclosure would damage the interests protected by the claimed exemption. The subseries contains two versions of this index, both incomplete. The subseries also contains summaries of the documents released by the FBI, in typescript (documents numbers 1011-2047), manuscript (2048-2227), and on audio tape cassette (12-2047). Few of the FBI documents are marked with the number assigned them in the Vaughn index: a series of folders contains copies of documents that are so marked, arranged in numerical order. Because one of the pillars of his case was the FBI's improper use of exemptions to redact and withhold information, Siminoski and his legal counsel spent considerable effort to determine precisely what exemptions were claimed on each document. The subseries contains Siminoski's manuscript notes, listing each document in Vaughn index number order, and indicating for each document the code for each exemption claimed. The subseries includes a tally sheet, listing each exemption in numerical order and indicating the number of documents in which each exemption was claimed. Siminoski also arranged copies of the FBI documents for analysis by FBI Headquarters or field office. These records were marked with the name of the office and a number representing the year of the document and the sequence of each document within that year, e.g., "LA 53-1"; in most cases, a form for analyzing the contents of the document was also attached. A small number of these documents survive, relating primarily to the Mattachine Society; these documents have been arranged by FBI office name and file number. Siminoski encoded all documents for entry into a computer database, and held "coding parties" each week at Jim Kepner's archives on North Hudson St., in Los Angeles. His correspondence with his ACLU legal counsel also refers to a printout of the information in this database. The collection contains no copy of this printout, and only a handful of encoded documents were found when the collection was processed. A representative number of these coded documents has been retained, as well as sample coding sheets and document coding instructions. The subseries also contains a small folder of Siminoski's analytical and statistical notes on the documents; a larger number of similar notes will be found attached to Siminoski's 1986 memoranda to his legal counsel in Series 2, Subseries 2 (box 15, folders 9-10).

 Indexes to FBI Documents 1983-circa 1986 

Box Folder

 Vaughn index 1983 

7 16

 Vaughn index, documents 1-1794 [1853] no date 

7 17

 Document summaries, 1011-2047 circa 1984 

7 18

 Document summaries, 2048-2227 circa 1984 

14 6

 Audio tape cassettes of document summaries, part 1 circa 1984   4 tape cassettes: 1 (12, 13; 363-370); 2 (14-54; 55-106); 3 (107-181; 172-334); 4 (335-461; 462-530).

17 1

 Audio tape cassettes of document summaries, part 2 circa 1984   4 tape cassettes: 5(531-623; 624-772); 6 (773-888; 889-1010); 7(1011-1114; 1115-1187); 8(1188-1279; 1280-1355).

17 2

 Audio tape cassettes of document summaries, part 3 circa 1984   4 tapes cassettes; 9 (1356-1460; 1461-1553); 10 (1553-1614; 1615-1735); 11 (1736-1815; 1816-1898); 12 (1899-1969; 1970-2047).

17 3

 Numbered Documents (Vaughn Index) 1954-1974 

Box Folder

 Correspondence 1984-1986 

7 19

 Documents 84, 402, 403 1957 

7 20

 Document 129 1962 

8 1

 Documents 255, 281, 358, 535, 590 1959-1966 

8 2

 Document 561 1954 

8 3

 Document 590 no date 

8 4

 Document 604 1962 

8 5

 Documents 754, 755, 757, 758 1968 

8 6

 Document 768 1966 

8 7

 Documents 992, 1003, 1004, 1010 1972-1974 

8 8

 Document 1506/1507 1970 

8 9

 Documents 1540, 1541 1970 

8 10

 Document 1906 no date 

8 11

 Document 2028/2029 no date 

8 12

 FBI Exemption Codes 1984-1986 

Box Folder

 Vaughn index documents 1-771 1984-1986 

14 7

 Vaughn index documents 772-2047 1984-1986 

14 8

 Vaughn index documents (incomplete) 1984-1986 

15 1

 Exemption code usage statistics 1984-1986 

15 2

 Documents Selected for Analysis 1953-1973 

 FBI Headquarters files 1954-1966 

Box Folder

 100-403320 (East Coast Homophile Organization - ECHO) 1965-1966 

8 13

 100-403320 (Mattachine Society/ONE) 1953-1971 

Box Folder

  1953-1954 

18 1

  1956 

18 2

  1957 

18 3

  1958-1959 

18 4

  1960-1962 

18 5

  1963 

18 6

  1964-1971 

18 7

 FBI Baltimore file 1972-1973 

Box Folder

 100-30225 (Gay Activists Alliance) 1972-1973 

8 14

 FBI Denver file 1959, 1961, 1967 

Box Folder

 100-8362 (Mattachine Society/ONE) 1959, 1961, 1967 

8 15
Box Folder

 FBI Detroit (Gay Activists Alliance) 1972 

8 16

 FBI Los Angeles file 100-45888 (Mattachine Society/ONE) 1953-1966 

Box Folder

  1953 

15 4

  1954-1956 

15 5

  1959, 1963, 1966 

15 6

 FBI Newark file 1972 

Box Folder

 100-55060 (Gay Activists Alliance) 1972 

8 18

 FBI San Francisco file 1975 

Box Folder

 100-73494 (Gay Activists Alliance) 1975 

8 19

 FBI Washington Field Office file 100-33796 (Mattachine Society/ONE) 1957-1972 

Box Folder

  1957-1958 

19 1

  1961-1962 

19 2

  1963 

19 3

  1964-1968, 1972 

19 4

 Document Coding 1984 

Box Folder

 Document coding instructions 1984 

8 20

 Coded documents (sample) no date 

8 21

 Document Analysis circa 1984 

Box Folder

 Analytical and statistical notes circa 1984 

15 7

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Series 2:  Series 2. Siminoski v. FBI 1982-2001   1.8 linear feet.

Series Scope and Content

This series comprises the records of Siminoski's request of October 22, 1982, for all FBI documents relating to the surveillance of gays and lesbians between 1950 and 1982, and of the subsequent lawsuit filed on his behalf by the ACLU Foundation of Southern California on October 11, 1983. These records include Siminoski's correspondence with the FBI and with his legal counsel, the legal filings in the case, litigation correspondence between Siminoski's counsel and counsel for the FBI, drafts by Siminoski and his counsel of various legal filings, additional attorney notes and drafts, and materials created or collected by Siminoski in the course of his lawsuit. The series is divided into three subseries: 1. Legal Filings, 2. ACLU Files, and 3. Dan Siminoski files.

 Subseries 2.1. Legal Filings 1982-1990   0.8 linear feet.

Subseries Scope and Content

This subseries contains the legal papers filed and proposed in Siminoski v. FBI, as well as the correspondence between Siminoski and the FBI, and between Siminoski's legal counsel, the ACLU Foundation of Southern California (represented by Joan Howarth, John Heilman, Paul Hoffman, and Jon W. Davidson), and the FBI and its counsel. The principal records are the complaint for injunctive relief (October 11, 1983; box 8, folder 9); the plaintiff's proposed statement of uncontroverted facts and conclusions of law, motion for summary judgment, and memorandum of points and authorities (June 23, 1986; box 9, folders 2-3); the report and recommendation of the Special Master, Ralph J. Geffen (November 3, 1988); transcripts of proceedings before Judge William D. Keller (June 19 and July 20, 1989; box 9, folder 19, and box 10, folder 3); and Judge Keller's decision (January 16, 1990; box 10, folder 5). While Geffen found for Siminoski on most points, Judge Keller reversed most of Geffen's recommendations; after discussion with Siminoski, who for health reasons had withdrawn from active participation in the case in 1986, the ACLU lawyers did not appeal Judge Kellers decision. The records also include the motion and supporting memorandum of points and authorities to disqualify Judge A. Andrew Hauck, to whom the case had originally been assigned, for anti-homosexual bias (November 7, 1985; box 8, folders 29-30). The memorandum of points and authorities of June 23, 1986, is incomplete, lacking exhibit 6 of volume 1, and all of volumes 2-5; however, the declarations of Robert J. Chester (June 15, 1985; box 8, folder 27) and Philip W. Thomas (October 11, 1985; box 8, folder 28) may be identical to exhibits 8 and 7, respectively, referenced in the index to volume 2. The litigation correspondence includes a copy of Siminoski's initial letter to the FBI, dated October 20, 1982, requesting under the FOIA photocopies of all FBI documents relating to the surveillance of gay and lesbian groups, as well as letters of transmittal that accompanied the release, beginning in March 1984, of records by FBI Headquarters and its offices in various cities; the FBI was still releasing documents under Siminoski's request in May, 1990. Although Siminoski began receiving copies of FBI documents in the first quarter of 1984, the lawsuit continued, on the grounds that FBI was not releasing documents in a timely manner, and that many of the documents released were improperly redacted. The correspondence between Siminoski's lawyers and those of the FBI constitute an important supplement to the court papers, as they provide additional discussion of issues raised in the latter.

Arrangement

Separated into (1) legal filings, followed by (2) litigation correspondence, both sections ordered chronologically.

 Legal Filings 1983-1990 

Box Folder

 Complaint for injunctive relief October 11, 1983 

8 22

 Answer to complaint December 28, 1983 

8 23

 Joint report of early meeting of counsel February 18, 1984 

8 24

 Stipulation to continue pre-trial conference hearing and order thereon September 13, 1984 

8 25

 Stipulation to continue pre-trial conference hearing December 11, 1984 

8 26

 Declaration of Robert J. Chester June 15, 1985 

8 27

 Declaration of Philip W. Thomas addressing the application of exemption one of the Freedom of Information Act October 11, 1985 

8 28

 Notice of motion and motion to disqualify or in the alternative to transfer the disqualification decision to another court; declaration of plaintiff; certificate of good faith November 7, 1985 

8 29

 Memorandum of points and authorities in support of plaintiff's motion of disqualification [against judge A. Andrew Hauck]; declarations; exhibit November 7, 1985 

8 30

 Joint status report January 2, 1986 

9 1

 Plaintiff's [proposed] statement of uncontroverted facts and conclusions of law June 23, 1986 

9 2

 Notice of motion and motion for summary judgment; memorandum of points and authorities. Volume 1 of 5 June 23, 1986 

9 3

 [Proposed] Order for summary judgment in favor of plaintiff June 24, 1986 

9 4

 Stipulation; order July 2, 1986 

9 5

 Defendant's opposition to plaintiff's motion for summary judgment November 5, 1986   3 volumes, volume 2 in 3 folders.

9 6-10

 Joan Haworth notes on FBI response November 17, 1986 

9 11

 Plaintiff's reply to defendant's opposition to plaintiff's motion for summary judgment; declaration of Joan W. Howarth; exhibits November 26, 1986 

9 12

 Stipulation to set hearing on summary judgment kotion, to establish briefing schedule and to outline issues in dispute; and order thereon April 1, 1987 

9 13

 Supplemental opposition to plaintiff's motion for summary judgment April 24, 1987 

9 14

 Plaintiff's response to defendant's supplemental opposition May 8, 1987 

9 15

 Submission of additional declaration and report regarding in camera declarations June 12, 1987 

9 16

 Notice of filing of magistrate's report and recommendation and the lodging of proposed judgment November 3, 1988 

9 17

 Defendant's objections to the report and recommendation of the Special Master December 12, 1988 

9 18

 Transcript of proceedings [before Judge William D. Keller] June 19, 1989 

9 19

 Plaintiff's supplemental memorandum of points and authorities regarding privacy exemptions to the Freedom of Information Act June 30, 1989 

10 1

 Joint status report and stipulation; order July 12, 1989 

10 2

 Transcript of proceedings [before Judge William D. Keller] July 20, 1989 

10 3

 Plaintiff's supplemental memorandum in support of motion for summary judgment re exemption (b)(7) July 26, 1989 

10 4

 Order re plaintiff's motion for summary judgment January 16, 1990 

10 5

 Gay Liberation Front undated 

10 6

 Litigation Correspondence 1982-1987 1990 

Box Folder

  1982 

10 7

  1983 

10 8

  1984 

10 9

  1985 

10 10

  1986 

10 11

  1987 

10 12

  1990 

10 13

 Subseries 2.2. ACLU Files 1983-2001   0.5 linear feet.

Subseries Scope and Content

This subseries contains materials from the files of the ACLU Foundation of Southern California, which represented Siminoski in his lawsuit against the FBI. The bulk of the documents--Siminoski's memoranda to Joan Howarth of February-June 1986, his "Searchability memo" of June 1986, and the three draft memoranda prepared by ACLU lawyers or paralegals (box 15, folders 8-12; box 16, folder 1)--all relate to the plaintiff's proposed statement of uncontroverted facts and conclusions of law, motion for summary judgment, and memorandum of points and authorities, dated June 23, 1986 (box 9, folders 1-2). Siminoski's memoranda are cut-and-paste drafts, with extensive manuscript analytical and statistical notes derived from the FBI documents attached. The correspondence folder includes communications between Siminoski and his ACLU lawyers, in particular Joan Haworth and John Heilman, as well as with the Texas law firm that represented Siminoski before the ACLU Foundation. The subseries also includes three folders of attorney notes and drafts, relating to the recovery of attorney’s fees (from the FBI), Judge A. Andrew Hauck and judicial prejudice, and miscellaneous matters.

Box Folder

 Siminoski/ACLU correspondence 1983-2001 

15 8

 Dan Siminoski memoranda to Joan Howarth February-June 1986 

15 9

 Dan Siminoski "Searchability memo" June 3, 1986 

15 10

 Memorandum of points and authorities in support of plaintiff's motion for summary judgment, June 23, 1986 1986 

Box Folder

 Draft A 1986 

15 11

 Draft B 1986 

15 12

 Draft C 1986 

16 1

 ACLU attorney notes and drafts 1983-1989 

Box Folder

 Recovery of attorneys' fees 1983-1989 

16 2

 Judge Andrew Hauck and judicial prejudice 1986 

16 3

 Miscellaneous 1983-1989 

16 4

 Subseries 2.3. Dan Siminoski Files 1982-1990   0.5 linear feet.

Subseries Scope and Content

This subseries consists of materials created or collected by Siminoski in the course of his lawsuit against the FBI. The correspondence files document Siminoski’s relations with other individuals either seeking, or who had already obtained, access through the FOIA to FBI surveillance files on GLBT organizations; his travels and lectures on FBI surveillance of gays and lesbians; and his move in the summer of 1983 from Texas to Los Angeles, where his project found a home at Jim Kepner’s Western Gay Archives at 1654 North Hudson St. They also include a proposal from an admirer in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, for an unrealized television movie on Siminoski's life. The files contain both original and copy letters, many with Siminoski's handwritten notes attached; correspondents include Harry Hay, Frank Kameny, and Morris Kight. The interview notes and followup correspondence document Siminoski’s visits to Washington, DC, in 1982 and 1983, to interview members of the administration, Congressional staffers, and government experts concerning the FOIA; the latest notes in the file document a conversation with the assistant to journalist Randy Shilts, who had also obtained photocopies of many of the same FBI documents through his own FOIA request, and had published an account of these records in the San Francisco Chronicle in September 1989. Additional files in the subseries evidence the intensive media campaign Siminoski launched with the filing of his lawsuit in October 1983. These files include consultation with a media consultant, correspondence with the gay media, extensive mailing lists of gay media organizations and individuals, and a press kit. The subseries also includes press releases relating to the lawsuit issued by the ACLU Foundation, and itineraries documenting Siminoski’s extensive travels in furtherance of his project. Siminoski also collected information on leading GLBT organizations, such as the Gay Rights National Lobby (where he also applied for the position of executive director), Lambda Legal Defense, and the National Gay Task Force. The records of the Freedom of Information Project, which Siminoski instituted in late 1984 with the help of Kepner and his archives (renamed the International Gay and Lesbian Archives earlier in the year), are of particular interest, as they include Privacy Act Waiver Forms with the notarized signatures of many prominent members of the GLBT community in 1984, including Virginia Apuzzo, Allen Ginsberg, Frank Kameny, and Bruce Voeller.

 Correspondence 1982-1987 1991 

Box Folder

  1982-1987 

10 14

  1991 

16 5

 Media 1983-1984 

16 6

 FBI "obscene" file 1986 

10 15
Box Folder

 Freedom of Information Clearing House 1986 

10 16

 Freedom of Information project 1984-1985 

16 7

 Gay Rights National Lobby 1983-1984 

10 17

 Lambda Legal Defense 1983 

10 18

 National Gay Task Force 1983 

10 19

 Interview notes and followup correspondence 1982-1983 1989 

16 8

 Itineraries 1983-1984 

11 1

 Liberty Hill Foundation grant 1987-1988 

11 2

 Mailing lists and contact addresses circa 1983-1990   2.0 folders.

11 3-4

 Media consultants 1983 

11 5

 Press kit 1983-1984 

11 6

 Press kit materials 1983-1984 

11 7

 ACLU press releases 1983-1984 

16 9

 Press clippings 1973 1983-1989 

16 10

 Telephone bills January-February 1984 

11 8

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Series 3:  Series 3. FOIA and Government Surveillance Reference Materials 1978-1990   0.7 linear feet.

Series Scope and Content

This series comprises materials collected by Siminoski relating to the implementation of the FOIA by federal law enforcement agencies, in particular the FBI. Publications and papers of the FBI account for almost half the materials, including photocopies, obtained by news reporter Carl Stern in 1981, of extensive portions of FBI Headquarters file 190-3, relating to the impact of FOIA and the Privacy Act on law enforcement activities. The materials also include reports by the General Accounting Office and the Congressional Research Service, a study by Senator Jim Sasser on Congressional oversight of the FOIA, and issues of the newsletters FOIA Update and FOIA Alert. The series also includes a folder of materials relating to the waiving of fees charged for photocopies of documents obtained under the FOIA; a FOIA files kit, with step-by-step instructions on how to obtain documents under the FOIA; a small number of manuscript notes by Siminoski; and a folder of press notices and other short publications relating to the general topic of government surveillance.

Arrangement

Arrangement: chronologically, by date of publication or creation (FBI Headquarters File 190-3)

Box Folder

 Sarah P. Collins, Citizen control over records held by third parties. Congressional Research Service, Report 78-255 GOV 1978 

11 9

 General Accounting Office, Timeliness and completeness of FBI responses to requests under Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts have improved April 10, 1978 

11 10

 General Accounting Office, Data on Privacy Act and Freedom of Information Act provided by Federal law enforcement agencies June 16, 1978 

11 11

 General Accounting Office, mpact of the Freedom of Information and Privacy Acts on law enforcements agenciesI November 15, 1978 

11 12

 Federal Bureau of Investigation, FBI Proposals to Amend the Freedom of Information Act 1979 

11 13

 Federal Bureau of Investigation. Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Annual Report to Congress 1980 

Box Folder

 Christine M. Marwick, ed., The 1980 edition of litigation under the Federal Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act. 5th ed. Washington, DC: Center for National Security Studies, November 1979. Extracts. 1979 

11 14

 Carl Stern, Freedom of Information-Privacy Acts (FOIPA) request for records pertaining to the General Accounting Office (GAO) study to evaluate the impact of the FOIPA on law enforcement activities. FBI Headquarters file 190-3 1979-1980 

Box Folder

 Section 2 

11 15

 Section 3 

11 16

 Section 4 

12 1

 Section 5 

12 2

 Section 6 

12 3

 Section 7 

12 4

 Section 8 

12 5

 Section 9 

12 6
Box Folder

 FOIA press clippings and photocopies 1980-1984 

16 11

 Center for National Security Studies, The CIA and the FOIA; a report analyzing CIA proposals to exempt most agency files from the Freedom of Information Act 1980 

12 7

 Harold C. Relyea and Elaine R. Tomchik, Managing official information--accessibility and protection in the federal government: a selected bibliography. Congressional Research Service Report 80-183 GOV 1980 

12 9

 FOIA Update 1981-1982 

12 10

 Waiver of FOIA fees 1981-1983 

12 11

 Jim Sasser, Oversight of the administration of the Federal Freedom of Information Act: a personal report 1981 

12 12

 Federal Bureau of Investigation. Impact of the Freedom of Information Act upon the Federal Bureau of Investigation December 11, 1981 

12 13

 Harold C. Relyea, Modifying the Freedom of Information Act: ideas and implications. Draft. Journal of Media Law and Practice, vol. 3 May 1982 

12 14

 [William Webster] Documented examples of the adverse effects of the Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act on law enforcement 1982 

12 15

 FOIA Alert 1983 

12 16

 Outweek FOIA request 1990 

12 17

 Fund for Open Information and Accountability: FOIA files kit no date 

12 18

 Dan Siminoski notes on FOIA circa 1982 

12 19

 Government surveillance 1972-1983 

12 20

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Series 4:  Series 4. Siminoski Personal and Professional 1977-1986   0.2 linear feet.

Series Scope and Content

This series comprises personal materials and materials created and acquired by Siminoski in the course of professional activities not directly connected with his FOIA lawsuit against the FBI. Personal correspondence includes applications for teaching positions, for positions at the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Community Services Center, and for the Jay Hayes Memorial Scholarship offered by The Lesbian/Gay Academic Union, as well as correspondence with both Frontiers and  The Advocate relating to proposed writing assignments. A separate file contains Siminoski's correspondence with Alyson Publications, including a signed contract for his proposed book,  Spies in the Closet: Federal Surveillance of the Gay Rights Movement, 1950-1982. Siminoski's writings include two conference presentations, and the draft of part (the section written by him) of "Perceptions of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and Proposed Amendments by the FOIA Administrators," which he co-wrote with J. Norman Baldwin and which was published in  Government Information Quarterly, 2 (May 1985). The series also includes copies and drafts of Siminoski’s column "Gay Community/Gay Power", later "Gay Politics/Gay Community" (including correspondence with Stonewall Features, the syndicate for whom the column was written), as well as copies of his article "Spies in the Closet", published in three parts in  The News in 1986, and a draft of Siminoski's cover article on Robert Rosenkrantz, "A Killing in Calabasas," published in the November 11, 1986, issue of  The Advocate. Additional documents include materials on the 9th National Conference of the Gay Academic Union (1983); on the Gay Press Association and Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Press Association, for whom Siminoski was national political correspondent in 1984; and on a proposed Voter Education Project (1984), to be jointly sponsored by the Gay Press Association and by the Jim Kepner's National Gay Archives, as well as several versions of Siminoski's academic vita, and a copy of his will.

Box Folder

 Personal correspondence 1983-1987 

13 1

 Correspondence, Alyson publications 1983-1986 

16 12

 Scholarly articles and conference presentations 1983-1984 

13 2

 Column "Gay Community/Gay Power" aka "Gay Politics / Gay Community" (Stonewall Features) 1983-1984 

13 3

 Column "Spies in the Closet" ( The News) 1986   3.0 parts.

16 13

 "A Killing in Calabasas" ( The Advocate) 1986 

13 4

 Gay Academic Union, 9th national conference 1983 

13 5

 Gay Press Association / Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Press Association 1983-1984 

16 14

 Voter Education Project proposal 1984 

13 6

 Academic vita 1977-1984 

13 7

 Will 1984-1985 

16 15

 Rhonda R. Rivera, Review of John D'Emilio, Sexual politics, sexual communities: the making of a homosexual minority in the United States, 1940-1970 (1983).  University of Pennsylvania Law Review, vol. 132, no. 2 1984 

13 8

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