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Self-Esteem
 

Does This Situation Describe Your Concern?

The Center for Work and Family Life is available to help in the following ways:

  • practicing better self-care
  • activating and expanding your support sytem
  • applying and integrating the information found in these book & web resources into your daily living
  • connecting you with providers or community resources that specialize in this topic

Please call CWFL to request personalized assistance on this topic

Our phone is 213-821-0800

Reading List Notations:

Green font indicates books that have been read by Center for Work and Family Life staff.

The Center does not specifically recommend or endorse any particular literature, nor does the absence of books from this list represent a recommendation against such works.

The Center for Work and Family Life would like to thank and give credit to the Stanford University Faculty and Staff Help Center, which was instrumental in helping to assemble this reading list.

Web Resources Notations:

The links listed are being provided as additional resources for you. Most of these are not affiliated with the Center for Work and Family Life.

Neither the Center, nor the University, is responsible for these websites, their content or the referral information they provide. As such, we encourage you to be an educated consumer in using the links to take you to the resources available for that topic.

If you have any questions, comments or find information on this page that is incorrect or no longer current, please contact us at (213) 821-0800 or at cwfl@usc.edu.

Download our pamphlet on this subject by clicking on the image below...

Smoking Cessation

Download our pamphlet on this subject by clicking on the image below...

Smoking Cessation

 

Reading List

Branden, Nathaniel (1995). The Six Pillars of Self-Esteem: The Definitive Work on Self-Esteem by the Leading Pioneer in the Field. Bantam

McKay, Matthew, & Fanning, P. (1987). Self-Esteem. Oakland CA: New Harbinger.

McKay, Matthew, et al. (1999). The Self Esteem Companion: Simple Exercises to Help You Challenge Your Inner Critic and Celebrate Your Personal Strengths. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger.

Sorensen, Marylyn (1998). Breaking the Chain of Low Self-Esteem. Sherwood, OR: Wolf.

Web Resources


Mayo Clinic: Self-esteem check: Too low, too high or just right?
Self-esteem is your overall opinion of yourself — how you honestly feel about your abilities and limitations. When you have healthy self-esteem, you feel good about yourself and see yourself as deserving the respect of others. When you have low self-esteem, you put little value on your opinions and ideas...

Psychology Today: Self-esteem
Possessing little self-regard can lead people to become depressed, to fall short of their potential, or to tolerate abusive situations and relationships. Too much self-love, on the other hand, results in an off-putting sense of entitlement and an inability to learn from failures.