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Resources for Addictions
 

Alcohol and drug abuse addictions

People often use alcohol or drugs to relieve stress or to help them cope with difficult situations. However, excessive use of substances can cause problems in one's personal and professional life.

If you are concerned about your pattern of substance use, or some other addictive behavior, you may contact a member of our professional staff to schedule a confidential appointment. We may be reached at 213.821.0800.

Download our pamphlet on this related subject by clicking on the image below...

Alcohol Facts

The USC Center for Work & Family Life is your confidential source for assessment, education, support, and consultation on addictions, such as:

  • Alcohol dependence
  • Drug abuse
  • Eating disorders
  • Gambling addiction
  • Pornography or sex addiction

We consider the proper identification and help for addictions to be our number one priority for our faculty, physicians, nurses and all other staff. Please call us for a free, confidential, non-judgmental consultation, whether you are concerned for yourself or someone in your life. We may be reached at 213-821-0800.

USC Health Benefit Plans for Chemical Dependency Treatment

  • USC Benefits Office—General Information
    UPC—(213) 740-6027
    HSC—(323) 442-1010
  • USC Network Health Plan
    Blue Cross PPO—Behavioral Health and Chemical Dependency Provider under Network
    (800) 728-9493
  • Kaiser Permanente Addition Medicine at Kaiser Sunset (Can direct you to other addiction medicine locations in SoCal)
    (323) 298-3100
  • United Health Care
    Addiction Medicine
    (800) 999-9585
  • California Care Mental Health/Substance Abuse Information (800) 728-9493

Alcoholics Anonymous at UPC
Alcoholics Anonymous is a twelve-step program that offers a process of recovery from alcoholism. USC provides a home to twelve-step groups in the University Religious Center. There are several AA and other twelve-step program meetings held each week, and they provide a solution to anyone who is curious, baffled, desperate, or hopeless regarding their drinking or substance abuse. The meetings are open to the public but provide an anonymous environment in which people can turn their lives around.

Contact: trojanrecovery@gmail.com


Web Resources for Substance Abuse and Addictive Behaviors

Alcohol
Narcotics
Other addicitons

Substance Abuse Treatment Facility Locator will help you find nearby drug and alcoholism treatment centers.


Alcoholics Anonymous at UPC
Alcoholics Anonymous is a twelve-step program that offers a process of recovery from alcoholism. USC provides a home to twelve-step groups in the University Religious Center. There are several AA and other twelve-step program meetings held each week, and they provide a solution to anyone who is curious, baffled, desperate, or hopeless regarding their drinking or substance abuse. The meetings are open to the public but provide an anonymous environment in which people can turn their lives around.

Contact: trojanrecovery@gmail.com

Educational Materials and Flyers
What is a Standard Drink?
Harmful Interactions: Mixing Alcohol with Medicine
Friends and Family Questionnaire
Fact Sheet: Alcohol and Stress

12-Step Groups - Web Resources
Adult Children of Alcoholics is a Twelve Step, Twelve Tradition program of women and men who grew up in alcoholic or otherwise dysfunctional homes.

Alanon and AlateenAl-Anon, which includes Alateen for younger members, has been offering hope and help to families and friends of alcoholics.

Alcoholics Anonymous® is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism.

Alcohólicos Anónimos (AA) outreach and support for speakers of Spanish. An international fellowship of men and women who have had a drinking problem; it is nonprofessional, self-supporting, nondenominational, multiracial, apolitical, self-help group open to anyone who wants to do something about their drinking problem.

Secular Organizations for Sobriety (S.O.S.) also known as Save Our Selves is dedicated to providing a path to sobriety, an alternative to those paths depending upon supernatural or religious beliefs. We respect diversity, welcome healthy skepticism, and encourage rational thinking as well as the expression of feelings.

Women for Sobriety is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women overcome alcoholism and other addictions. Their "New Life" program helps achieve sobriety and sustain ongoing recovery.

Reading List

Addiction & Recovery

Alcoholics Anonymous "Big Book": The Story of How Many Thousands of Men and Women have Recovered from Alcoholism (1976). New York: AA World Series, Inc.

Johnson, Vernon (1980). I'll Quit Tomorrow: A Practical Guide to Alcoholism Treatment. New York: Harper & Row.

Milam, James Robert, & K. Ketcham (1981). Under the Influence: A Guide to the Myths and Realities of Alcoholism. Seattle: Madrona Publishers.

Pinkham, Mary Ellen (1986). How to Stop the One You Love from Drinking. New York: GP Putnam & Sons.

Prochaska, James, J. Norcross, & C. DiClementi (1994). Changing for Good. New York: Avon Books.

Schaefer, Dick (1987).Choices and Consequences. Minneapolis, MN: Johnson Institute.

Schierse, Leonard, & L. Schierse (1989). Witness to the Fire: Creativity and the Veil of Addiction. Boston: Shambhala Publications.

Adult Children of Alcoholics, Codependence

Beattie, Melody (1987). Codependent No More: How to Stop Controlling Others and Start Caring for Yourself. San Francisco: Hazelden.

Black, Claudia (1981). It Will Never Happen to Me. Denver: M.A.C. Printing & Publishing.

Cermak, Timmen, & J. Rutzky (1994). A Time to Heal Workbook: Stepping-Stones to Recovery for Adult Children of Alcoholics. New York: Putnam.

DiClemente, Carlo (2003). Addiction and Change: How Addictions Develop and Addicted People Recover. New York: Guilford Press.

Mellody, Pia. Facing Codependence (1989). San Francisco: Harper & Row.

Prochaska, James, J. Norcross, & C. DiClementi (1994). Changing for Good. New York: Avon Books

Sommers, Suzanne. Keeping Secrets (1988). New York: Warner Brothers.

Note: A first-person account about being an adult child of an alcoholic

Prochaska, James, J. Norcross, & C. DiClementi (1994). Changing for Good. New York: Avon Books

Woititz, Janet Geringer. (1983). Adult Children of Alcoholics: Expanded Edition. Deerfield Beach, Fl: Health Communications, Inc.

Woititz, Janet Geringer (1985). Struggle for Intimacy. Deerfield Beach, FL: Health Communications.

 

Narcotics

Cocaine Anonymous is a 12-step program for people who desire to stop using cocaine and all other mind altering substances.

Dual Recovery Anonymous is an independent, twelve-step, self-help organization for people with a dual diagnosis of chemically dependence and an emotional or psychiatric illness. Addresses how both illnesses affect all areas of life.

Marijuana Anonymous is a 12-step program for people who wish to stop using marijuana.

Narcotics Anonymous is a 12-step program for people who desire to live their lives without the use of drugs.

Salvation Army Adult Rehabilitation Centers provides a list of rehabilitation inpatient centers for people of limited means.

Women for Sobriety is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping women overcome alcoholism and other addictions. Their "New Life" program helps achieve sobriety and sustain ongoing recovery.

Addictive Behaviors

Gamblers Anonymous is a 12-step program for people who wish to stop gambling compulsively.

Overeaters Anonymous is a 12-step program for people who wish to overcome their compulsive use of food.

Debtors Anonymous is a 12-step program for people desiring to stop compulsive spending and to avoid unsecured debt.

Sex and Love Addicts Anonymous (SLAA) is a 12-step program for people who wish to stop self-destructive acting out in their relationships.

Reading List

Eating Disorders

Bulik, Cynthia, & N. Taylor (2005). Runaway Eating: The 8 Point Plan to Conquer Adult Food and Weight Obsessions. Rodale Press.

Lock, James, & D. le Grange (2005). Help Your Teenager Beat an Eating Disorder. New York: Guilford Press.

Mellin, Laurel (1997). The Solution: 6 Winning Ways to Permanent Weight Loss. New York: HarperCollins.

Note: For people who have trouble controlling their food cravings

Roth, Geneen (1991). When Food is Love: Exploring the Relationship between Eating and Intimacy.New York: NAL-Dutton.

Roth, Geneen (1982). Feeding the Hungry Heart. Indianapolis, IN: Bobbs-Merrill.

Zerbe, Kathryn (1993). The Body Betrayed: A Deeper Understanding of Women, Eating Disorders, and Treatment. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Press.