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RESEARCH - HEALTH CONTRACTS AND GRANTS AWARDED

USC GRANTS AND CONTRACTS AWARDED
January - February 2006

College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

  • Norman Arnheim, professor of biological sciences: $243,937.00 by the Ellison Medical Foundation for research on the Ellison Medical Foundation Senior Scholar Award in Aging: molecular studies of the paternal age effect. (Project duration: 1/5/2006 – 1/4/2010)

  • Gayla Margolin, professor of psychology: $40,613.00 by the National Institute of Mental Health for research on spouse aggression: mental and physical health consequences. (Project duration: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006)

Keck School of Medicine

  • Woojin An, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology: $75,000.00 by the Early (Margaret E.) Medical Research Trust for research on a central role of histone acetylation in chromatin function.
    (Project duration: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2008)

  • Lucio Comai, associate professor of molecular microbiology and immunology: $40,831.00 by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences for research on biochemical characterization of Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome.
    (Project duration: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2009)

  • Celling Science:  Recipients Of The First Stem Cell Training Grants Include The Keck School Of Medicine Of USC, Childrens Hospital Los Angeles And Caltech

On a Friday in early September, California made scientific history—again—when the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) gave out its first grants to institutions throughout the state. These stem cell biology training grants allow institutions to begin training aspiring researchers in the sorts of cutting-edge stem cell techniques that may lead to the scientific advances this branch of medical research promises.

Among the named institutions were the Keck School of Medicine of USC, which received a three-year, $3.16 million stem cell training grant, and its affiliated Childrens Hospital Los Angeles, which received a three-year, $2.3 million grant. Overall, the agency—created by the passage of the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative in November 2004—promised some $39 million to 16 institutions. The agency is currently unable to distribute the money due to pending litigation brought by opponents of the California Stem Cell Research and Cures Initiative.

CIRM’s Research Funding Working Group lauded the Keck School’s application for “the very high quality of the program director, experience of staff in research training, the commitment of the institution to developing a major effort in stem cell biology and the substantial pool of high-quality applicants.” The Keck School’s grant was one of several that were announced in Sacramento during a public meeting of the Independent Citizen’s Oversight Committee (ICOC), the group charged with governing CIRM and the way in which it disperses the $3 billion in total funding.

“This is an exciting moment for the CIRM, as these awards mark the first step in our scientific program of stem cell research—an accomplishment we have been able to achieve in less than one year as a state agency,” says Zach Hall, Ph.D., whose official appointment as CIRM’s president was announced along with the grant awards. “The CIRM training program established today will be the most comprehensive training program to date in the field. It will provide a pipeline of highly trained basic and clinical investigators for the research that CIRM will fund in California.”

HSC Weekly, 1/15/06
Go to article: http://www.usc.edu/hsc/info/pr/hmm/06winter/celling.html

  • Young-Kwon Hong, assistant professor of surgery: $75,000.00 by the Early (Margaret E.) Medical Research Trust for research on the dissection of molecular mechanism underlying the lymphatic reprogramming of the vascular endothelial cells by Kaposi’s Sarcoma Herpes Virus (KSHV). (Project duration: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006)

  • Lynda Knox, associate professor of family medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, has been awarded $1.6 million by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to study the impact of multi-family group interventions on the health and well-being of immigrant children.

The grant is the USC portion of a $4.3 million award to the Southern California Academic Center for Excellence in Youth Violence Prevention to continue and expand its programs. The Center, which is based at the University of California at Riverside, is a consortium of faculty from five universities including the Keck School of Medicine, the University of California at Irvine, the University of California at Los Angeles and the University of California at Santa Barbara.

With the new five-year grant, the Center becomes one of eight Comprehensive Academic Centers for Excellence funded by the CDC.

HSC Weekly, 2/3/06
Go to article: http://uscnews.usc.edu/hscweekly/detail.php?recordnum=12055

  • Amy Lee, director of basic sciences at Norris: $240,000.00 by the American Cancer Society, Inc. for research on the American Cancer Society Institutional Research Grant. (Project duration: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2008)

  • Ite Laird-Offringa, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology, and Joseph Hacia, assistant professor of biochemistry and molecular biology: $50,000.00 by the Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation for research on rapid screening of DNA mdthylation markers for accurate molecular diagnosis of mesothelioma.
    (Project duration: 1/1/2006 - 12/31/2008)
  • Janos Peti-Peterdi, associate professor of physiology and biophysics: $100,000.00 by the American Heart Association for research on novel paracrine mechanisms in the distal nephron. (Project duration: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2010)

  • Axel Schönthal, associate professor of molecular microbiology & immunology: $75,000.00 by the Early (Margaret E.) Medical Research Trust for research on the identification of the indispensable targets required for the anti-tumor effect of celebrex and a non-COX-2 inhibitory derivative. (Project duration: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2006)

School of Pharmacy

  • Clay Wang, assistant professor of pharmaceutical sciences: $720,000.00 by the American Cancer Society, Inc. for research on the biomechanism based drug design in Escherichia coli. (Project duration: 1/1/2006 – 12/31/2009)

Viterbi School of Engineering

  • Pin Wang, assistant professor of chemical engineering: $584,139.00 by the National Institutes of Health for research on targeting lentiviruses to infect chosen cells.
    (Project duration: 2/1/2006 – 1/31/2011)

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