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TELEPHONE INTERVIEW OF COGNITIVE STATUS (TICS)

Why is this study being done ?
The goal of this study is to determine whether or not a test of thinking skills administered over the phone is accurate. The ultimate goal of the study is to help find a practical way to identify mild cognitive impairment and dementia in the elderly.

What will participation in this study entail?

There are two stages to this study:

  • Stage 1:Study participants will be contacted by telephone and administered a medical history questionnaire and the Telephone Interview of Cognitive Status (TICS). Based on the scores of the TICS, participants will be allocated to one of two groups- no cognitive impairment group or possible cognitive impairment group.
  • Stage 2: A random number of participants will be selected from each group and administered neurological and neuropsychological assessment. On the basis of these assessments, participants will be diagnosed as non-demented, mild cognitive impairment, or demented and results are compared to the TICS results.

Who is eligible to participate in this study?

We are looking for individuals who have been classified as non-demented, mild cognitive impairment, or demented on the basis of a neurological evaluation and neuropsychological assessment.


How can I enroll in this study?
This study is currently enrolling volunteers. If interested, please contact:
Maya Slowinska (mslowins@usc.edu)
University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine
Phone: (323) 442-7600



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